Currently viewing the category: "Recipes"

You don’t really need anything else with this sandwich, except maybe some chips, and a beer or some iced tea. You have meat, a couple vegetables, starch, it’s all there. If you take the time to fry chicken, it is always good to make extras as it is the perfect leftover to start another meal with.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This came about to go into a sandwich with a coleslaw done for the CSA box. Nothing too fancy, no brining or soaking, just dip, shake, and fry.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This was made to go on a fried chicken sandwich, but is great as is. Using a Ben-Riner or other fixed blade slicer (or even a food processor) makes this a quick-fix dish.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use this for South West inflected slaw, for a dip for vegetables or chips, or however. This was made for a slaw to go on a fried chicken sandwich.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Another dish in the “I love to sauce vegetables with vegetables” category. Here, the earthy funky qualities of leeks and collards are counterbalanced with the sweetness of carrots. The carrots are cooked and milled to a consistency that is not quite a pureé, not quite chunky, but a good match for the silky leek and collards. Although the recipe seems long, the time to make is not, and it is a simple dish to prepare. The sauce goes well with other items such as cauliflower, grilled squash, chicken, pork, or fish.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Sometimes simple is best. If you want to add a little more dimension to this, New Natives grows broccoli microgreens which perfectly straddle the line between arugula and almond, and will add loft to the salad. Gorgonzola Dolce is a sweeter version of Gorgonzola, but if you cannot find it, just use Gorgonzola.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Crunchy topped vegetable studded gooey goodness. What’s not to like? And if you have carnivores to deal with, add in crumbled Italian sausage, bacon, or ham and you will make them quite happy.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a dressing based on a sauce posted before. The trick is to char, not to burn the scallions. This flavor strikes some as odd at first, but there is something about it, maybe the primal fire-pit thing makes b.b.q. irresistible, which makes this dressing very appealing. It goes well with bold and earthy flavors, such as the radish escarole salad, or with a grass-fed beef steak salad. Keep it handy for dipping vegetables into or anointing sandwiches with, or drizzling on firm fleshed fish, shrimp, and eggs.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This salad is a contrast of textures and flavor elements. Soft butter lettuce and crunchy radish. Bright clean flavors of radish and lettuce against the smoky charred notes of earthy funk laden scallions. This is nice with a big slab of well toasted country rye bread with plenty of really good butter on it flecked with large crystal salt such as Murray River or Sel de Guerande.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use this as is for a side dish, or cook some pasta such as orecchiette, cavatelli, or casarecce (or whatever) and use this as a sauce. Don’t forget to add 4-6 ounces of the pasta water to the dish to help form the sauce. It may seem odd to use salami here, but it is not uncommon in Italy, and the right salami can bring a lot of flavor to a dish. The Toscano called for here is typically flavorful and fairly easy to find.  For this dish, larger fat grains are good, and a fine deep flavor with some spice is good.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

It seems the majority of people I tell about sautéing cucumbers balk at the idea, yet never think twice about eating sautéed zucchini. Bearing in mind that summer squash are a New World import, all those Chinese dishes with zucchini in them probably used cucumber originally. When cooked well, cucumber has a pleasantly mild flavor that plays well with other flavors, and can retain its pleasing crunch while softening up at the same time. Some partners to consider are King Oyster and regular oyster mushrooms, snap and snow peas, chicken, sweet carrots, fish or scallops, or mild soft greens such as spinach. The version here is kept very simple to showcase the cucumber flavor and lovely marriage with the basil. Consider this as a bed for poached or baked chicken, or fish or sautéed scallops, or gently sautéed pork chops.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Sweet and hot, with normally crunchy carrots cooked tender and sauced with whole grain mustard which adds pop and crunch texture to the dish, along with a little heat and sweetness, as well as depth from the fig. Serve with kasha, pork chops or chicken, or greens. This is a dish that is quite simple, and is easy to gussy up.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Another recipe for the Quickles file. Romanesco lends itself beautifully to quickling-it maintains it crisp texture yet no longer tastes raw. This iteration was made for a Sicilian influenced salad, but it is easy enough to change your destination by changing your herbs and spices. Use these in the salad recipe or serve with plates of salami and charcuterie, burgers, or braises. Good with grilled salmon as well. If you just want these as a snack, see notes about adding lemon.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Here’s a nice crunchy salad with some tang to spark the appetite when it is hot. This salad would be good as a foil to fatty grilled meats.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Although a simple dish, there is plenty of subtle flavor, and this is a great side for spicy or boldly flavored dishes.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Strawberries have enough tartness to stand out in a salad. The ones you want are the ones that have a little firmness to them still, not the really soft ones.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is for a salad of soft lettuces and strawberries, but would go with cold pasta salad with tomato and cucumber, with cold chicken for a hot summer day, poached salmon hot or cold, or something with cabbage or kales, as well as salads made up of Romaine or Little Gems.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Carrots and mint, carrots and basil, these seem a natural combo. Adding the caramelized Tokyo turnips adds just a touch of bitter to the mix which contrasts nicely with the sweet carrots. If using purple carrots, keep the turnips separate until serving so the color of the carrots doesn’t make the turnips look smudgy. As bunches of everything vary, you want an equal amount, or slightly more carrots than turnips.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Sort of a cross between a kale salad and a quickle. Allowing time to sit in the refrigerator will soften the cabbage a little without taking away the crunch. Caraway gives the salad a Nordic bent. Use cumin, coriander, and a little lime juice to take this in a South Western direction, or sub lemon or orange for lime and go Middle Eastern/North African. This salad keeps well, and is a great lunch box item as it travels well.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is the dressing that goes with the above named recipe, but this, or any number of variants, could go with any salad of dense leaves such as the cabbages, kales, or things like mei quin choi or shredded carrot or celeriac. Lighter in oil, this recipe will not emulsify like a regular vinaigrette. Adding mustard will help the salad thicken, but be careful what mustard you use and how much lest you blow out the dressing and just have a thin and pungent mustard garnish for the salad.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This recipe is actually based on a chicken dish, but instead the broccoli gets the chicken treatment. This dish can be served hot with dinner or cold in small amounts as salad/snack/appetizer. You could also just blanch the broccoli until just crisp-tender and drop it into ice-water to stop the cooking, and then toss it in the sauce ingredients which were cooked together earlier and allowed to cool.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Simple in make-up, but the flavors are refreshing and the contrasts of cold and warm and crisp and succulent make for an enjoyable salad. The dressing is made from the butter and oil used to roast the radishes, and are infused with fresh basil flavor.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Here is a dish that straddles the line between dinner and dessert, sweet and savory. Depending on how you season this, it could go either way. Here I was thinking dessert, but I tend to like not very sweet desserts, so this is not as sweet as you could make it.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This sauce is meant to go with a carrot custard, but would be wonderful with duck, chicken, or pork. Use with panna cotta or other desserts as well. You can make it sweeter by adding sugar or agave to it, as the sugar in the recipe here is just enough to wake up certain flavors in the berries. You could add liqueur to the sauce to sweeten it as well*. This will also intensify the berry flavor. If you want a perfectly smooth sauce, pureé all the berries instead of three-quarters as called for in the recipe.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

A variation on a theme, only here the butter and oil from roasting form part of a Meyer lemon dressing that garnishes the radishes and dresses the Little Gem lettuce salad this recipe is destined for. This recipe would be nice with fish, chicken or pork, or anything that would go with the word picatta.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The Provençal accents here are fennel seeds and a hint of lavender to add a mysterious deep and floral note that pairs well with fennel. Make this with any summer squash you have, just try to cut all the slices the same thickness.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish uses ingredients that commonly are found in dishes that get named “Persian”. This is a pretty dish with the white cauliflower tinged with the deep purple of the syrup, and then the scattering of creamy pine nuts and green mint. If you are not a fan of mint, substitute fresh marjoram and some flat leaf parsley.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Simply flavored, easy to execute, simply delicious. Much of the secret lies in the thickness of the cut, and having fresh squash which are moist and not bitter. The rest lies with finding the sweet spot on the grill, where it is not scorchingly hot, nor where the heat is sort of feeble. The heat should be a 5-second heat, meaning it should take 5 seconds for your hand, 5 inches above the grill, to become painfully hot and you have to pull it away. This would be like medium-high on the stove.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is to with the Arugula, Dried Apricots, and Pistachio salad, but it can be used with other components as well. Try with Butterleaf or oak leaf lettuces with plenty of sprouts.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a Provençal inspired recipe with a twist. Some people find that summer squash has a subtly bitter flavor, which is unpleasant for them. This recipe plays that flavor up, and also counters it, by using caramelized sugar on the surface of the cuts on the squash. Caramelized sugar has both a bitter quality and sweetness, as do the squash. Costata Romanesco, Cousa, and tromboncini squash (look for this unusual squash at markets) all have firmer flesh than zucchini or crookneck, and can be seared and browned without getting mushy as quickly the latter. If using a mélange of these, add the zucchini and crooknecks later than the rest. These squash also pick up an almond-like nutty flavor when caramelized.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

SIGN UP FOR CSA PROGRAM

When you join our CSA, you sign up with the farm to receive a share of the harvest during our 36 week season from mid-March to mid-November. In return, you get a weekly box of organic vegetables and fruit (and optional flowers) delivered straight from our farm to a pick-up site in your neighborhood.

Signup for the CSA program >

View our CSA Members Page

This is where you can go to find out what's coming in your box each week, find recipes, identify your vegetables with pictures, and view or print the current and past newsletters. Check here for the information you need to use your box to the fullest.

Visit the CSA Members Page >