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apple varietiesClick for apple recipes

We offer several varieties of apples during the late summer and fall. At our home farm, we have planted orchards of Jonagolds, Rubinettes, Waltanas and Hudson’s Golden Gems. 

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Click for artichoke recipes

What I want to know is, who was the first person to eat an artichoke, and why? Ponder the artichoke and you too may wonder this same thing. The artichoke is a member of the thistle family (a sub-group of the sunflowers), and is aptly named.

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ArugulaClick for arugula recipes

Arugula, or “salad rocket”, is a leaf with a rich peppery flavor that originates from the Mediterranean region.  It is high in Vitamin C and potassium and is often mixed with milder lettuces or greens to produce a balanced flavor in a salad or with cooked greens.

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basilClick for basil recipes

Basil is an aromatic herb belonging to the mint family.  Basil originates from India but certain varieties are used commonly in Southeast Asian cuisines. It has a strong, pungent, if sweet, smell.  This versatile herb is commonly used fresh in Italian and other Mediterranean dishes, added at the very end as to not lose too much flavor. 

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Beans1Beans and peas are one of those marvelous crops that not only taste delicious, they actually give back nutrients into the soil.  Peas can take nitrogen out of the air and “fix” it  into the soil.  Nutritious for you, nutritious for the earth. We offer several kinds of beans throughout the season.

Click for romano bean recipes

Click for filet bean recipes

Click for cranberry shelling bean recipes

Click for fava bean recipes

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Red Ace BeetsClick for beet recipes

We grow several varieties of beets.  Red Ace beets are the earthy deep red kind. Chioggia beets are a beautiful candy-striped beet, an heirloom variety from the Italian town of Chioggia, near Venice. Golden beets are sweet (and won’t turn everything you are cooking red). 

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blueberriesClick for blueberry recipes

We have four varieties of blueberries in our blueberry patch,  Southmoon, O’Neal, Misty, and Jewel–which are supposed to ripen sequentially so that we could stagger our harvest over a longer season than if we just had one variety.

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Mei Quin ChoiWhat’s in a name? Well, no roses here, but if you are talking about Brassica rapa, Chinensis , there is quite a bit in the name. Not only are there several names appended to this member of the Crucifer family, there are what appear to be several plants as well.

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braising mix 002-22Braising mix is a variety of baby cooking greens. One of our favorite mixes includes mizuna mustard greens, tatsoi, red russian kale, and green kale. The tender baby greens can be sauteed quickly for a delicious side dish.

broccoliheads  Click for broccoli recipes

Broccoli is a member in the cabbage family, in which the large flower head is used as a vegetable.  It has a strong, positive impact on our body’s detoxification system and when streamed can have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol.

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Cabbage-Red  Click for cabbage recipes

Cabbage is a hardy member of the Brassicaceae family and grows well in High Grounds cool climate. We grow green, red and savoy cabbage, all of which are regarded as being good sources of vitamins.

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carrots  Click for carrot recipes

At our home farm, we have been growing Chantenay carrots for the past few years. These are wonderful fat sweet carrots perfect for cooking or juicing. The long, thin carrots of the Mokum variety, thrives in the sandy soil at the Lewis Rd. farm site.

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cauliflower2thm

Click for cauliflower recipes

As an excellent source of vitamin C, and a very good source of manganese, cauliflower provides us with two core antioxidants. The grafitti (purple) and cheddar (orange) cauliflower varieties are beautiful to look at and just as tasty.

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celery  Click for celery recipes

While most people associate celery with its prized stalks, the leaves, roots and seeds can also be used as a food and seasoning as well as a natural medicinal remedy.  Celery is in the carrot family, and if left to flower, attracts many beneficial insects.

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Celery Root, The Ugly Duckling

If I had a dollar for every time I heard someone pick up a celery root and say something like, “What is this, it’s so ugly!” I think I’d be quite well off. It’s funny, because in France the word “céléri” refers to the celery root (a.k.a. “céléri-rave”), whereas it is always “céléri branche” for the stalks Americans know and crunch for everything from dips to diets. Celery root is also known as celeriac, and is one of three forms of celery; root, branch (or stalk), and leaf, but they are all variants of the same plant.

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Chard  Click for chard recipes

We grow several varieties of chard.  You might see Ruby Red, Golden, White or a Rainbow of colors. Chard is a member of the beet family, but unlike beets, it is the leaves and stalks that are eaten. Chard’s leaves are always green, but the stalks can be a variety of colors ranging from red to yellow to white. High in Vitamins C, K, A and Iron, chard is one of the most nutrient-rich vegetables around.

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Cilantro

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Cilantro, or coriander leaves, is an annual herb and member of the carrot family.  It is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking.  Cilantro has antioxidant and antibacterial properties and is said to aid digestion, anxiety and Type 2 diabetes.

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collards

Click for collard green recipes

Collard greens are a part of the brassica family, along with cabbage and broccoli, but lacks a central “head”, so it is the oval-shaped leaves that are eaten.  Collards are a good source of vitamin C and soluble fiber, and have nutrients with anti-cancer properties.

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Click for fennel recipes

I can remember back to a time that I just didn’t get the appeal of fennel. This course, stringy, strongly scented vegetable didn’t seem worth the trouble to cook. But now I can honestly say that it is among my very favorite vegetables. I fully realize that there are many of our CSA members who still don’t “get” fennel, and if you are among these, you simply must try Jeanne’s recipe for roast fennel and onions.

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Green Garlic Click for green garlic recipes

Green garlic is young garlic which is harvested before the cloves have begun to mature.  It  resembles a scallion, with a deep green stalk and a pale white bulb, but has a garlicky taste.

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kale-lacinato

Click for kale recipes

Kale is a type of cabbage that does not form a head from the central leaves.We grow three varieties of kale, green curly leaf or Scotch kale, Lacinato or Dinosaur kale, and Red Russian kale.  Kale is high in beta carotene, vitamin K and vitamin C and calcium.

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kohlrabiKohlrabi is an odd vegetable that I think is often bought more for appearance than for the desire to eat it. Looking like something from a science-fiction movie, they come in lovely deep purple or jade green, and the leaves come up from all over what seems to be the root.

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leeks  Click for leek recipes

Leeks, like garlic and onions, belong to the allium family. Since leeks are related to garlic and onions, they contain many of the same beneficial compounds found in these well-researched, health-promoting vegetables.

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Lettuce Rows

Lettuce Rows

Click for salad recipes

Lettuces grow exceptionally well here at our home farm near the coast. They love the cool foggy summer weather. We grow Red Leaf, Green Leaf, Butter Lettuces, Little Gem, and Romaine varieties and offer a mix of baby salad greens in our early spring boxes.

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mustard greens  Click for mustard greens recipes

Spicy and tangy, mustard greens are often associated with Southern slow cooking, but quick braising or  fast stir-fries make this a quick fast meal.

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Click for onion recipes

We offer several members of the allium family in our boxes including spring onions, scallions, purplette onions, leeks and green garlic.

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peppers  Click for pepper recipes

We offer a few varieties of sweet peppers that grow nicely at the warmer sandier soils of the Lewis Rd farm. You may see green bell peppers, Padron peppers or Corno di Toro peppers. Some can be eaten raw and in salads, others for stuffing, roasting, soup, stews, relishes or pickling.

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potatoes  Click for potato recipes

We grow several varieties of potatoes, including Sangre, Romanze, and Desiree, all heirloom varieties.

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radishes

radishes

Walk into many a taqueria and there they are. Sitting next to the pickled jalapenos and the lime chunks, there is usually a bowl of radishes. I asked a friend of mine, who is of Mexican descent, about why this is, and she did not have a concrete answer. Her surmise is about the same as mine-they are cheerful looking and look nice on a plate, and the cool crunch and hint of heat are welcome foils for the sometimes oily meats and density of refried beans.

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romanesco  Click for Romanesco recipes

Romanesco broccoli is not really a true broccoli, it’s more properly classified as a cauliflower and is referred to both ways.  If you think that veggies are boring, wait until you look at the amazing  ”fractal” design in these beauties.  AND they are delicious!

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SIGN UP FOR CSA PROGRAM

When you join our CSA, you sign up with the farm to receive a share of the harvest during our 36 week season from mid-March to mid-November. In return, you get a weekly box of organic vegetables and fruit (and optional flowers) delivered straight from our farm to a pick-up site in your neighborhood.

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View our CSA Members Page

This is where you can go to find out what's coming in your box each week, find recipes, identify your vegetables with pictures, and view or print the current and past newsletters. Check here for the information you need to use your box to the fullest.

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