Currently viewing the tag: "apples"

A cool weather warmer that can be used as an opening course for a fancy dinner, or just enjoyed as is.

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A typically savory grain dish with a sweet surprise-bits of lightly sautéed apple to counter the earthiness of the chard and mushrooms. This is classically Italian in heritage, where raisins or currants are used to offset bitter greens.

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Turnips and apples are a great combination, with flavors that echo one another as well as flavors acting as foils to one another. Serve as a side to light meats or with a sauté of earthy mushrooms or grains such as kasha, farrow, or brown rice.

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This pureé makes a nice accompaniment to greens with earthy flavors or meats such as pork and chicken. Roasting the squash makes for a deeper flavor, and keeps the squash from getting soggy leaving the pureé watery and bland. The addition of onion rounds out the flavors.

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This dish can be made with Scotch or Lacinato kale, but the more delicate Russian kale would not work as well. Use a good cooking apple that is firm and sweet with an edge of tartness.

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The silky texture of escarole always seems at such odds with its bitter flavor. Adding a little sugar and caramelizing it until on the border of burnt both tames and points out the bitter quality of this vegetable, and the addition of sweet/tart fruit and vinegar made from the fruit amplifies this idea. This dish goes well with meats with mild roast chicken or fatty pork chops with a nice crust for textural contrasts. It would also be a nice complement to kasha with braised mushrooms or even fried eggs.

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This mélange could be used as a stuffing for poultry, Portobello mushrooms, or Delicata squash, a filling for pasta or chard leaves, or just served as a side. Add grains to it for a heartier dish, or top with pine nuts for elegance.

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Although I usually wouldn’t use chard raw, kale salad got me wondering. If the chard is very tender and the leaves are smaller, they are perfect for this. If they are larger and thicker, and eating some raw makes your teeth feel sort of furry, wait for another time to make this. Serve this as a salad on its own or as a side to cider braised pork chops, ham steak, or sausages.

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INGREDIENTS:

1 bunch Tokyo turnips*, washed well and cut into ½-inch wedges
2-3 firm apples, sweet-tart, cut into ½-inch wedges, seeds removed
1 small white or yellow onion, finely diced
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
½ cup apple cider
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
2-3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves roughly chopped
Salt and Pepper to taste

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This salad is a contrast of sharp and peppery with sweet and crisp. If you are not a fan of cilantro feel free to skip it, but the minty-citrusy hard to describe flavor of cilantro leaves, in a small quantity add a nice note in the face of the more bold flavors of radicchio and arugula. This salad is a great foil for pork, duck, turkey, or chicken. If you feel the salad needs toning down a little, use the option for adding the lettuce, which will spread out the other more forthright flavors.

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For what it’s worth, gratin refers to the cooking vessel and the way it is used, not just the dish itself. Anything can be cooked “au gratin” and the recipe itself is varied. Potatoes alone, or mixed with other roots such as parsnip, turnip, or onion. Mushrooms, kale, artichoke hearts, olives, all these can go in as well. The dish can be made with or without cheese, with cream, milk, stock, or any combination of these. In summer, I make gratins with vegetables that are “wet” (tomatoes, eggplant, etc.) and the only liquid I use is a little bit of flavorful olive oil. In colder months I make traditional creamy, cheesy gratins with roots and tubers. You can be precise in the way you lay in the ingredients or you can be casual. Bear in mind that the thickness of the cuts, the density of the vegetables, and how tightly packed in the dish everything is can affect the cooking times. This recipe is a variation of a quiche I used to make, and it is named for Denise who likes it so much I can never make enough.

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The “Sweet and Sour” in this dish comes from the apple cider and cider vinegar employed to sauce the greens. This is a fairly quick dish to cook, and the flavors go well with richer dished or will cut through the fog of a head cold also. The sweetness of the dish is cut by the sharpness of the greens themselves, and the acid of the Granny Smith apples and the vinegar.

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This salad goes well with roasts, braises, or grilled dishes. The tart apple and mild spice of the arugula combine to give the salad backbone, and the nuts and cheese add a lushness to the salad that is complemented by the crispness of the apples, nuts, and arugula.

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This is a dish with lots of flavor, and while filling, it will not weigh you down. The apple adds an unexpected lightness and sweetness that plays well with the squash and makes an excellent foil for the earthiness of the other ingredients. Feel free to leave it out if it seems discordant to you. This basic recipe is a good starting point for playing with your food. Try different types of squash. Experiment with whatever leftover grains you might have. Switch the greens around as well as the mushrooms.

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Crisp sweet-tart apples make a nice foil to the nutty unctuous cauliflower. This is a dish where you want a fixed-blade slicer like the Ben-Riner, or a food processor with a ¼-inch slicer disc.

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Colorful and crunchy with lots of bright flavor. The hazelnuts add a pleasing depth, and I like the idea of using them as I am told there are hazels near the Lewis Road part of the farm. I just haven’t found them yet…

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Inspired by Waldorf Salad, this has a lighter dressing and has cheese added, based on the classic pairing of apples and cheese.

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Made to go with Apple Celery Almond and Cheese Salad, this dressing is a natural for anything sharp and nutty as well. Arugula, sprouts, escarole, all would be complemented by this dressing.

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apple varietiesClick for apple recipes

We offer several varieties of apples during the late summer and fall. At our home farm, we have planted orchards of Jonagolds, Rubinettes, Waltanas and Hudson’s Golden Gems. 

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Roasting the squash adds depth of flavor, and the apple and squash are a great combination. There are different options for seasoning the soup that, while they are small changes, they move the soup a lot in terms of flavor.

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Here is a variation of the beet and kale salad. Using a mandolin for this is ideal, but a grater could be used, although the beets will bleed and the apples will break down more rapidly.

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Tastes like a cross between dessert and a vegetable dish. A little sweet, a little savory, and really good.

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Here’s a riff on a favorite from the 2012 Harvest Fair. Here I use Chioggia beets, but golden beets would work as well. The red beet beets would do okay, but are “earthier” tasting. The dressing has a very little cream in it to offset the acid of the apple and the tannins of the greens.

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Earthy, a bit sweet, fragrant, and it can be a little spicy as well, this soup is great for cold weather. The color is quite cheerful as well. This soup can be made well in advance and reheats easily, so it is good for holiday parties where your attention may be needed elsewhere.

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This dressing goes on the Savoy Cabbage and Apple Slaw, but is also good on things like an apple arugula salad or a fennel apple salad. You could even dress cauliflower sautéed with apples with this.

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Cabbage and apples are frequently seen in each others company in recipes for a reason, and that is because they taste really good together. The crunch and sweetness of the apple plays up those same qualities of the cabbage, and the earthiness of cabbage plays up the floral aromas of apples. This slaw is quick, simple, and tastes great. This is a recipe where having a mandolin or Ben-Riner really helps. Apples such as the Hudson’s Golden Gems and Rubinettes are perfect for this dish as they are crisp, sweet, and have some acid to balance out the dressing and cabbage.

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This frosting is used for the Apple Cake Muffins, or if you decide to turn the muffins back into a cake. The muffins/cake is not that sweet. The frosting definitely is!

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These are a nice treat for breakfast or lunchboxes, and are not very sweet. This was originally a cake recipe that was frosted with a caramel icing, and can be used as a cake. Remove the cinnamon and vanilla and bake in small loaf pans as an unusual accompaniment for a cheese plate. Works well with sharp cheddars and brie.

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A perfect dish for a cool autumn evening..

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Mix 4 tablespoons softened butter with 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, 2 teaspoons sugar, and salt and pepper to taste; use some of the mixture to grease a baking dish. Rub 4 cored apples inside and out with the remaining butter mixture. Place 4 thick onion rounds in the dish and top with the buttered apples. Add a quartered fennel bulb to the dish. Bake at 425 degrees until the apples are soft, 1 hour.

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