Currently viewing the tag: "arugula"

Here’s a salad where textures, flavors, and colors all play off one another. Even the beets join in as the different color beets are seasoned with different types of vinegar. The dressing is a light creamy (yogurt) dressing flavored with garlic chives. The flavor and aroma are redolent of garlic, but do not have the heat of clove garlic.

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This salad is all about the interplay of the ingredients-the various kinds of crunch against the silkiness of the avocado and the dressing. The nutty flavor of arugula and the bread crumbs and the bite of radish and arugula.

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Although people think the idea is strange, people always like the savory waffles once they try them. Anytime I cook grains, I always make a little extra and freeze it for recipes like this one. This recipe utilizes another recipe that was a stand-in for another recipe. It is always fun to watch the progression of some dishes. This recipe works for brunch, or as an interesting dinner salad, or you could have it alongside some protein for a light dinner. It is important to the success of this dish that the waffles be hot and crisp.

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Sometimes simple is best. If you want to add a little more dimension to this, New Natives grows broccoli microgreens which perfectly straddle the line between arugula and almond, and will add loft to the salad. Gorgonzola Dolce is a sweeter version of Gorgonzola, but if you cannot find it, just use Gorgonzola.

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This salad originated as a substitute for the salad that goes on Elephant Ears (see recipe on site), but has found its way onto grilled chicken, crisp multi-grain or mochi waffles, toast, mixed with seared scallops, and used as a side salad. Switch to hazelnuts and use hazelnut oil, do the same with almonds. Use fresh apricots when you find some that are fragrant, flavorful, but still a little firm.

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This salad of sharp and/or bitter greens is cut with a sweet-ish dressing made with port wine as part of the base, along with roasted almond oil to link to the nuts and the microgreens. If you can’t find the broccoli greens, use some others, but the broccoli micros from New Natives have a wonderful sweet and nutty flavor cut with a bit of sharpness that is perfect here. This salad would be good with rich foods or simple dishes such as a roast chicken cooked with little other than salt and pepper, some oil or butter rubbed on and maybe thyme. It will also play well with roast winter squash dishes.

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Simple, basic, and full of flavors. Eat this as a salad off a plate or pile it onto very hot crostini so the heat can melt the cheese a little and wilt the arugula. Use using oil with a soft bite but big fruity flavor is a good idea here so it softens the bite of the arugula and doesn’t mask the nuttiness of the favas.

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Good as an appetizer using diagonal slices of baguette, or use larger slices topped with the salad and a fried egg with a runny yolk or two for breakfast or a light lunch.

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Early crop strawberries have a tart edge while still being sweet. This creates an interplay with nutty spicy arugula, and the sharpness of the radish is first mitigated by a short ice-water bath, and then the sweetness of the berries.

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This salad has plenty of crunch along with lots of flavor thanks to the quickled leeks, arugula, and dressing. You could add beets and/or a cheese like feta along with some pistachios maybe, but don’t add too many extras or the salad will become confusing to the palate and the flavors will be muddied.

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This dish takes a bit of prep, but the results are worth it. Serve hot, warm, or room temp, as an appetizer or a light main course with a salad. It makes excellent picnic food also.

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The lettuces used here are what was used for this recipe originally, but other choices will work as well.

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The peppery notes of the cress and rocket play up the sweetness of the beets. The shreds of Little Gems add crunch and loft to the salad, while the orange in the dressing adds a bright note with some sweetness to marry with the beets and contrast with the nutty peppery cress and rocket. If you wish, you can serve the salad without the lettuce and use a standard Balsamic Vinaigrette. Use this as an accompaniment to things like steaks or roast chicken. You could also serve it alongside (or in the cup of the cap) roasted Portobello mushrooms. If you wanted you could add orange suprêmes to the salad just before serving.

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This makes for a nice breakfast, but would be good as lunch, a light supper, or late night bite.

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The Salsa Verde for this recipe uses enough olive oil to make it a dressing. If you wish, you can use a creamy orange fennel dressing (See recipe) instead.

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This is a light refreshing salad with a peppery quality that could easily double as a topping or side for something like seared pork chops or duck breasts. You want to use pinky-thin sweet carrots for this, and they should be sliced really thinly-a mandolin would be ideal. The carrots are there to offer a sweet contrast to the other vegetables. If you don’t have skinny sweet carrots, skip them and use pine nuts or almonds instead.

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This salad is a contrast of sharp and peppery with sweet and crisp. If you are not a fan of cilantro feel free to skip it, but the minty-citrusy hard to describe flavor of cilantro leaves, in a small quantity add a nice note in the face of the more bold flavors of radicchio and arugula. This salad is a great foil for pork, duck, turkey, or chicken. If you feel the salad needs toning down a little, use the option for adding the lettuce, which will spread out the other more forthright flavors.

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Prosciutto works just fine here as well the Serrano ham, and is much less expensive. Regular arugula can stand in for the wild, and if you don’t have Petite Basque or Manchego handy, go with buffalo mozzarella. If you wish to be authentically Spanish, use sherry vinegar for the onions and Serrano ham. Going Italian? Use balsamic vinegar and mozzarella with Prosciutto.

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Bitter, sweet, peppery, nutty, crunchy, and silken, this salad seems to have it all. The white peach is really what acts as the catalyst for all these flavors to work together. Although it may seem an odd combo, give it a try.

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This could be eaten as a salad, but it would work equally well as a topping for a pork chop, or, grilled or roasted chicken, or a side dish with meat. It would be nice on a salad accompanying a cheese course.

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This salad goes well with roasts, braises, or grilled dishes. The tart apple and mild spice of the arugula combine to give the salad backbone, and the nuts and cheese add a lushness to the salad that is complemented by the crispness of the apples, nuts, and arugula.

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Made to go with Apple Celery Almond and Cheese Salad, this dressing is a natural for anything sharp and nutty as well. Arugula, sprouts, escarole, all would be complemented by this dressing.

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Big vibrant flavors to wake up the palate, with the sweetness of the fennel to mitigate the bite of the onion and the arugula.

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This dressing is about the tomato, so only do this when you have tomatoes with plenty of flavor. This is also a pretty dressing, especially when you have different colors of tomatoes. This dressing has a nice combination of fruitiness, acid, and sweetness, and is great on fish, grilled shrimp, chicken, or mixed with arugula and tossed onto grilled slabs of chewy bread. It is good on salads, too.

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This is meant to be eaten as a salad course, but with a little tweaking of the ingredients it would make a nice topping for flattened out and grilled pork chops or chicken breast.

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For this salad, you want to use a softer lettuce such as a butter lettuce or green or red leaf. It works better with the blueberries, as something crunchier, like romaine, might overwhelm the berries texture and flavor. The dressing uses basil as the herb, but you could try mint instead. A little arugula would work well, but go lightly or the sharpness could drown out the other ingredients.

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This dressing was made to go with the Strawberry Spinach Salad, but will work to dress other things as well. This would work well on a salad of arugula, mizuna, mei quin, and mushrooms, or would be nice on grilled fish or pork skewers. Just remember to go easy with the sesame oil. Use just enough to detect it, but not enough to flat-out taste it. The same with the soy sauce.

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This balsamic vinaigrette has a little more nuance from the honey mustard, and since that brings flavor to the dressing, you can save the better balsamic vinegars for other things.

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Paper thin slices are key to success with this salad, so use your sharpest knife for the lemons and a Ben-Riner or mandolin for the radishes. If you do not have Meyer lemons, Eurekas will work if they are ripe, so look for deep yellow and fragrant ones.

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This dressing is for the Arugula, Celeriac, and Hazelnut Salad, but goes well with many things. Any thing with arugula, and beets match especially well with this dressing, as do crisped porcini mushrooms. For nut oils, I like the Tourangelle line of oils. I find them to be full flavored, fresh, and relatively inexpensive for the quality, which I find to be consistent.

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