Currently viewing the tag: "braise"

Light in flavor with a bit of heft, use this as a side or a base for something like grilled fish or poultry. You could combine it with noodles if you wanted — something like ramen or soba, or bucatini would be good.

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Although a whole head of garlic seems like a lot, the roast really mitigates the heat and gives a warm creamy garlicky flavor which is offset by the acid in the tomatoes.

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The smoky sweet bacon talks to both the sweetness of the carrots and the earthiness of the kale, enhancing both. If you have some King Oyster mushrooms, they would be an excellent addition.

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A simple yet flavorful braise with nice colors, this is a nice accompaniment for fish, chicken, or pork chops. The dish works fine without the rainbow carrots as long as they carrots are sweet. It will also be less vibrant on the plate, of course.

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A colorful dish with a range of flavors. Serve as a side or a main for a light supper with poached eggs, or add some white beans and a grain such as farro, spelt, or barley and grate some cheese over the top for a complete protein.

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You could do this with the vegetarian dashi, but the smoky aroma and depth of flavor from the hana-katsuo really make this dish. Although it is not quite the same, and it will tint the dish red, you could use smoked paprika if you wish to go vegetarian. Use this dish as a base for seared fish or roasted King Oyster mushrooms. You could also use this as a base for noodles/pasta.

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Since the main components of this dish are large, this is a knife and fork dish. It can serve as a base for something larger like fish, or you can use it as a side. Add some slices of pork and some noodles and it can be a one-pot full meal.

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A light and satisfying dish that goes well with lighter flavored proteins, or pairs well with beans and light grains such as rice or quinoa.

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Slowly braising Romano beans renders them meltingly tender, but they retain their shape and pick up a sweet and nutty quality. The other vegetables in the dish become silky and the chard adds depth and earthiness. Bacon always goes well with beans and greens, but if you prefer not to use it, substitute some sweet smoked paprika.

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Using larger pieces and cooking the liquid down is the difference here between a stew and soup. Technically this is closer to a “braise”, but it says “stew” to me.

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This dish compounds the flavor of fennel by using it in multiple forms-bulb, fronds, seeds, and in the liquor from southern France known locally as pastis.

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Here is one use for the stalks of fennel that recipes always tell you to “reserve for another use”. Putting the salmon on the stalks of fennel allows the fish to cook a little more gently, preventing drying out and also imparting a subtle fennel flavor tinged with a bit of smoke. Top the fish with Quick Braised Fennel for Fish or Chicken to compound the flavors, and then if you wish, to take it further, put the salmon in a large bowl with braised vegetables such as carrots and cauliflower and then ladle Fennel Broth (see recipe) around the fish, top with braised fennel and drizzle with olive oil and serve.

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Although any pretty much any carrot will work, big Chantenay carrots are great here. Chantenay become sweeter and seem to be tenderer as they get larger, and for slow cooking, as in this recipe, they are perfect. The nuts added at the end add crunchy contrast to the tender vegetables, and the nutty flavor adds depth to the dish.

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Slow cooking the Romano beans brings out the sweetness of the bean and leaves them meltingly tender without getting that furry feeling that over cooking these beans in water can yield. The scallions add the bass line to this dish, and the sweetness of the fennel adds top end. Once this dish gets going, resist the urge to stir it, or even open it, for at least 30 minutes.

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If you don’t have leeks, just substitute 2 onions, yellow or red, halved and sliced into half-moons.

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Here is a basic “recipe” I use a lot, especially in the summer; this is for “roasted” onions. It is more of a technique than a recipe, as it only calls for onions and flame, really. These onions are a key ingredient to my dark vegetable stock as they lend a depth of flavor, deep color, and the pectin helps to produce a density or viscosity to the stock that is usually derived from animal products. I use these onions in braises, soups, and salsas. Tossed with a little vinegar (red-wine or balsamic) then placed on toasts they make a nice quick appetizer. They elevate roasted peppers. These onions find their way into eggs, pastas, and sandwiches. Good for pizza, too. Grill a few and keep them in a sealed box in the refrigerator. They last 4-5 days.

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This is a flavorful mélange that is not wet enough to be a soup, but not dry, either. Although you could easily add more liquid for a soup or cook it dry as a side dish.

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This is a dish inspired by the flavors of southern France. The addition of the semi-dry (a.k.a. oil-cured or semi-dry oil cured) olives adds a depth and sweetness to the dish along with a winy/meaty flavor.

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This gets the “Provençal” from the use of fennel and “pastis”, which is an anise flavored liqueur from France. As it is most often consumed in Provence and the surrounding areas, it is associated with the cuisine of the area as well. You can make the dish without the pastis, but it does taste better with it. Fennel is also used a lot in the cuisine of the area, both as a main ingredient and as a flavoring agent.

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Unless you have home made tomato sauce, canned tomatoes work best here, especially if you have good Italian San Marzanos. Otherwise, just use your favorite. Be sure to use a really big pan for sautéing the squash, or do it in batches. If the squash is crowded it will steam and just get mushy.

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This is a simple recipe that requires using Ham Stock Number 2 (see recipe). It is a nice dish to accompany things, especially ham steak cooked in orange juice and hoisin with shiitakes. There is no ham in the dish, other than what was used to infuse the stock.

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If the idea of ham does not appeal, use some Pimenton de la Vera instead for the broth. The smoky flavor really pulls this dish together. Use more stock to turn this into a brothy soup, or cook it down until the stock has reduced to a glaze and serve as a side. Finishing with a few drops of a vinegar based hot-sauce, vinegar, or lemon juice adds a bright spark to the dish and emphasizes the sweetness in the ham, leeks, and peas.

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INGREDIENTS:

2 cups cooked cranberry beans (see recipe for “Basic Braised Shelling Beans” on site)
1 bunch collard greens, stemmed and shredded 1/8th inch, washed
2-3 “spring” onions (1 cup) sliced thinly into shreds
3 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup diced ham, or a 1-inch chunk from the end of a prosciutto (Some delis will save these for you if you ask. They are excellent for seasoning dishes such as this.) slashed with a few deep cuts

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INGREDIENTS:

1 head cauliflower, broken into florets and florets halved
1-2 bell peppers or Corno di Toro (any colors are fine), seeded and cut into ½ inch dice
1 tomatoes, cut into medium dice
2-3 “spring” onions, cut into medium dice (around ¾ to 1 cup)
2 cloves garlic, minced

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This dish can be a starter, side, or even a light supper or breakfast. You can even make it with lots of liquid when you crave something soupy. Add a poached or fried egg to it for a supper. If you have left-over beans or grains, you can add some of those to expand the dish.

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This is just one of those combinations of flavors that works really well. If you don’t have artichoke hearts, make the dish without them. It will still taste fine. If you do not have Desiree potatoes, use another waxy fleshed potato.

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With the fennel and olives, this dish says southern France to me. The sauce for this dish is fragrant and it’s good to have something like rice, noodles, or some chewy bread to soak it up.

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Not quite a stir-fry, this is a dish where a small amount of liquid is introduced to steam the vegetables and form a bit of sauce. In traditional Chinese cooking this is viewed as a braise. This sort of braising is used on vegetables with a more delicate texture or flavor. For this dish you will need a 10 inch pan or wok that has a tight fitting lid.

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Can be used with the smaller mei quin choi or bok choi

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Here is my riff on a French classic. Although the lettuce may seem an odd thing to include, it really does work here. This recipe is more of a guideline really, as cooking times will depend a lot on the peas. There are many versions of this recipe, and here is one more. The only thing to really watch out for is overcooking the peas, so taste one every few minutes, and when they are almost done, add the lettuce to finish off. This recipe is for 2 cups/2 pounds of peas, which gives a good sized portion to each person. The recipe varies easily enough, so base amounts on the volume of peas you have.

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