Currently viewing the tag: "broccoli"

This salad takes a little planning and has a few steps to it, but with a little bit of strategics it is easy enough. And the work that goes into this is rewarded with lots of clean flavor and crunch. Although substantial on its own, if you need more protein, it will take easily to some chicken or bacon.

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Here, the nutty earthy flavor of roasted broccoli is countered with a slightly sweet carrot inflected persillade-the classic parsley garlic mixture used to top many a bistro dish. The persillade has the crunch of toasted bread crumbs as well as carrots-and if you like, pistachios-to play off the slightly chewy broccoli. Serve as a side with steak, duck, tuna, or other items with a deep dark flavor.

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The broccoli is blanched just enough so it is no longer raw, and then seared in a hot pan to crisp it up a little before being tossed with a sweet and savory mélange of pancetta, diced tomatoes, and herbs.

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This is meant to be a topping for bruschetta, but works perfectly as a side dish or topping on flatbread.

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Crunchy topped vegetable studded gooey goodness. What’s not to like? And if you have carnivores to deal with, add in crumbled Italian sausage, bacon, or ham and you will make them quite happy.

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This recipe is actually based on a chicken dish, but instead the broccoli gets the chicken treatment. This dish can be served hot with dinner or cold in small amounts as salad/snack/appetizer. You could also just blanch the broccoli until just crisp-tender and drop it into ice-water to stop the cooking, and then toss it in the sauce ingredients which were cooked together earlier and allowed to cool.

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I was having lunch out where a piece of steamed broccoli on the plate had gotten into the sauce from my chicken. An inspiring accident. I played with the idea a bit and landed here.

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This is a riff on a recipe from NoMAd by Daniel Humm and Will Guidara. I like how the dish explores the different textures of broccoli and different flavors based on temperature. The recipe takes a little bit of work, but no more than most people lavish on a meat course for a weekend dinner. So why not spend that attention on vegetables? Much of this work can be done ahead of time, with the cutting and fricco being done the day before, along with the steaming of the florets. You want broccoli with long stems for this recipe.

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These are great straight out of the refrigerator, or make for a great salad, which is what they were first made for.

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Roasting the tomatoes with a little sugar before making the glaze intensifies the tomato flavor, and brings out their fruitiness. The glaze is closer to a jam than ketchup, and can be used on cauliflower, squash, fish, chicken, or pork and beef. Add a dollop to braises or a stew of squash, onions, and eggplant.

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Very simple, but lots of flavor. Watching the broccoli blanch so it does not overcook, and cutting it to the right size, is key here. Don’t overdo the mint or it will overwhelm the dish. Use just enough to taste as an accent. Also, try to use as little oil as you can get away with for this dish as it helps the broccoli to stay firm and bright.

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This dish is a pretty jade green color flecked with gold and velvety black and white. The flavors seem to appeal to everyone and the dish tends to disappear rapidly. The key to this recipe is restraint; use a light hand when blanching the broccoli, adding the sesame oil, as well as the candied ginger. Prep for this dish could be done ahead of time.

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Here is a riff on the now ubiquitous grocery-store deli salad. This is a great way to use the stems of broccoli, and could be made entirely with stems if you wish. If you do so, back off the volume by 2 cups or you will have a lot of slaw. This is one of those recipes that can be varied a lot for different but equally tasty results.

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This is a super simple slaw dressing that works with the Broccoli Slaw recipe, or any other slaw type salad with assertive flavors like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, or beets. This is the closest thing to the dressings on slaws in grocery store deli’s I can come up with.

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This dressing was designed for Broccoli Slaw, but will enhance many other things that that have a bit of peppery bite or assertive flavor, such as dishes with cauliflower, cabbage, arugula, cress, and the like. This iteration is a little lighter than v.2 as it uses less mayonnaise, and a little more oil.

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This recipe calls for a sweet mustard spiked dressing, but this combo would really well with an orangey-creamy dressing such as Creamy Orange Dressing (see recipe) or Orange Poppyseed Cream Dressing (see site for recipe). If using an orange based dressing, try adding pistachios or almonds instead of sunflower seeds.

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berryThe strawberries are coming in very strong now, so we’ll continue Strawberry U-picks through the month of August. The berry patch is right next to the Farmstand this year, so we can spread out the U-picking time window to accommodate more of your schedules. Come anytime between 10:30 AM and 4:00 PM on Saturdays or Sundays. Just check in with Mike at the farmstand first to weigh your containers or get an empty one from us.

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This “sauce” is made from broccoli cooked until very tender and then mashed or pureed. For the polenta, you can use either soft cooked polenta, or use the rolls of hard cooked polenta and grill the slices, or simply oil them up and roast or broil them in the oven.

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The silky butter lettuces contrast with the crunch of the broccoli and the crisp bite of the turnip dice fills in for croutons. The broccoli (and turnips) can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator, and the broccoli is great as is for a snack or a side, or you can even chop it up and add it to a sandwich.

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These are great straight out of the refrigerator, or make for a great salad, which is what they were first made for.

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This salad is a study in contrasts with the tender slightly bitter Butter lettuces and the silky nutty avocado up against the crunchy sweet-tart elements of the quickles. Using plenty of Italian parsley in the vinaigrette gives an earthy and green element to bring things together.

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Depending on the cheese you use, this can be sort of light and cheesy, or you can make it nice and gooey with plenty of chew to it. For the latter, use a mixture of provolone and mozzarella with a little parmesan or romano thrown in for flavor depth. You could also use a sharp cheddar if you wish, and add some bacon if you are feeding carnivores who typically eschew vegetables.

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This recipe involves cooking tomatoes, onions, and garlic down to a jam-like consistency and tossing blanched broccoli in the sauce to coat. The recipe may make more than you need for the broccoli, and if that is the case, just freeze the remainder and use it on pasta, other vegetables or use it coat roasted chicken, fish, or shrimp.

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A quick salad to be made the day before. Simple, but with lots of flavor and texture, and it travels well. This can be made the “day of” if you use the freezer, just be sure to keep an eye on everything. You want stuff chilled, not  frozen!

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This dish is a medley of concentrated late-summer flavors. The fresh tomatoes are cooked down to concentrate their sweetness, and the polenta is made from stock made from corn cobs which really brightens its flavor.

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An all-vegetable and grain stuffing makes this lighter than the usual version with ground beef stuffing. This is a great way to use up left-over grains such as farro, bulgur, rice, or quinoa.

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This is a dish where a vegetable replaces a typical sauce of a highly seasoned liquid bound or thickened in some manner. Here, the chopped broccoli is braised in garlic oil until meltingly soft, so it is mildly sweet and a little nutty, then it is tossed with confit garlic cloves for richness and a smooth garlic flavor (minus the garlic “heat”), and then roasted almonds are added for crunch and to amplify the nuttiness of the broccoli. This makes a perfect foil to the briny sweetness of fresh halibut. Or any other firm fleshed fish you care to try, such as salmon, cod, etc. Also, it is a great way to use vegetables in a role other than just a side.

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This recipe produces a smooth textured broccoli that is a bit sweet and nutty tasting, with a lovely garlic perfume without the heat that garlic usually has. The secret is in the use of the garlic confit and the oil from that to slow poach the broccoli. This dish is a great base for a “sauce” for roasted fish such as halibut or salmon. This recipe can be used on cauliflower as well. One of the key elements to this dish is using low temperatures to avoid the swampy smell brassicas can emit.

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This soup uses potato to give it a creamy feel, and there is no dairy in it at all. The garlic used is young “green” garlic which has a lovely garlic aroma and a mild flavor without any heat. If you wish, omit it. The soup is excellent either way. This soup is also good served cold a la Vichyssoise. See Notes for ideas. By the way, you do not want this soup to boil- boil this soup and it will turn khaki and smell very broccoli-esque. This recipe includes a step where the stock is simmered with the peelings of the broccoli to add flavor. This is optional, and omitting it won’t hurt.

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This salad was inspired by a little plate a chef sent out one hot night almost thirty years ago. It was made with just the stems, peeled and cut into cubes, and was one of those things where the chef was being thrifty. I would have paid gladly for this great combination of cool crunch and silky, nutty flavored sauce.

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