Currently viewing the tag: "butternut squash"

A cool weather warmer that can be used as an opening course for a fancy dinner, or just enjoyed as is.

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The lettuces used here are what was used for this recipe originally, but other choices will work as well.

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This pureé makes a nice accompaniment to greens with earthy flavors or meats such as pork and chicken. Roasting the squash makes for a deeper flavor, and keeps the squash from getting soggy leaving the pureé watery and bland. The addition of onion rounds out the flavors.

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Pureeing fennel, leeks, and butternut squash give this soup a rich creamy texture while the absence of cream or other dairy keeps it light and airy. This would even be good as a cold soup on a hot day, or could be used as a sauce for light proteins such as chicken or goat. To use as a sauce, just use less stock to thin it with. Although the recipe looks longish, it really is simple and fairly quick, and does not require a lot of attention.

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This mélange could be used as a stuffing for poultry, Portobello mushrooms, or Delicata squash, a filling for pasta or chard leaves, or just served as a side. Add grains to it for a heartier dish, or top with pine nuts for elegance.

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Here is a sauce that feels rich in the mouth and has big flavors. The texture of the sauce comes from the squash and onions, and there is no cream in it. This sauce was devised for topping red beets, but it would be fine for fish, chicken, or even pork. It would also be nice on pasta as a fun twist on the classic Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Butter Sauce (see recipe for Pumpkin Ravioli on site). Stuff ravioli with chard and cheese, or add ground turkey or pork, and top with the sauce.

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This is a colorful dish with an interplay of textures and contrasts of flavors to add interest. The sauce is sweet and provides high notes, the cabbage is the mid-range and provides sweet and earthy, where the beets are mostly low range and have earthy notes tinged with a mellow sweetness. The vinegar the beets are drizzled with after roasting adds balance. Be sure to cook the cabbage just long enough render it tender, but still possessing some crunch.

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This will fill the kitchen with all sorts of wonderful aromas.

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A medley of textures and flavors, this dish has a nice amount of bitter and tart to offset the sweet elements, keeping it light. This recipe would work well on the Thanksgiving table. If you do not have dates, apples work also. See Chef’s Notes.

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This dish is sweet, nutty, and “green”, with a sweet and funky base from leeks, garlic, and sage, and then is topped with a bread crumb Persillade. Both light and satisfying, if you add some cooked shelling beans and grains like barley or farro you have robust vegetable dish that can stand alone.

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This is very definitely an autumnal salad that is a study of contrasts and complements. If you can get the pomegranate seeds, do use them as the acid really adds to the whole. This salad can easily be turned into a full meal by enlarging it and adding grilled chicken or shrimp that has marinated in pomegranate juice, garlic, and mint.

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This is a variation on a theme for soup we call “Monday Soup”, which is a hearty vegetable soup, usually with sausage added, that can be eaten for 2-3 days after for lunches or whenever. This one uses a fair amount of fennel, and so will be a little sweet, which is countered by the greens and with vinegar added at the end.

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This soup has a rich and creamy texture, and a light body. It is a little on the sweet side from the onions and squash. If you wish to add substance to it, you could add cooked rice- Forbidden or wild rice would be nice for color and texture- and various vegetables such as carrots, mushrooms, spinach, etc. If you wish, you can roast the squash or steam it instead of sautéing it.

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This salad is amenable to any of several dressings; Balsamic, Maple, Apple Balsamic, Cilantro, Cinnamon Cilantro, or even Traditional Blue Cheese or Lighter Blue Cheese Dressing. Any of these will work, but here the recipe is set up with Cilantro Cinnamon Vinaigrette

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You could view this as a pasta dish, with the collards standing in for the noodles, and the squash as part of the sauce, such as the potatoes in a traditional Pasto alla Genovese, and serve it on its own, or use it as a side dish.

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Roasting the squash adds depth of flavor, and the apple and squash are a great combination. There are different options for seasoning the soup that, while they are small changes, they move the soup a lot in terms of flavor.

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These gnocchi are great with the “standard” brown butter with sage, but adding hazelnuts for depth and a little crunch make these memorable. A light tomato sauce with garlic would also be a good pairing.

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field pumpkins 2010

Click for winter squash recipes

Winter squash comes in shapes round and elongated, scalloped and pear-shaped with flesh that ranges from golden-yellow to brilliant orange. Winter squashes have hard, thick skins and only the flesh is eaten. They take longer to mature than summer squash and are best harvested once the cool weather of fall sets in. They can be stored for months in a cool basement-hence the name “winter” squash.

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Tastes like a cross between dessert and a vegetable dish. A little sweet, a little savory, and really good.

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Inspired by Farmer’s Daughter

 INGREDIENTS:

1 cup squash puree
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup sugar
3 beaten eggs

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This dish reminds me of Halloween. The roasted squash echoes candles burning Jack O’Lanterns and the cider vinegar and cinnamon echoes hot cider. The bacon reflects wood fires or leaves burning.

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Use these as croutons on salads or soups, or simply serve them as a side dish.

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Croutons are a way to add crunch. Here, it is the romaine that is the crunchy part, with the butternut cubes crisped on the outside and sweet and melting inside as a foil for the crisp and slight bitterness of the romaine. The roasted pumpkin seed oil adds a nice flavor and a lot of depth to this salad.

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Here’s a dessert idea for the squash from http://www.recipetips.com/recipe-cards/t–68974/squash-squares.asp

INGREDIENTS:
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
4 eggs, beaten

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Prepare Winter Luxury pumpkin, moschata squash (cheese pumpkin), butternut squash or other pie pumpkin either by oven roasting in a covered heavy pan with enough liquid to allow the squash to cook until soft without browning or by allowing cubed squash to cook in a pot of water on top of the stove until tender (check with a fork). Allow the cooked squash to completely drain and cool and puree in a food processor. Add pumpkin pie spices. For every 2 cups of pureed squash add 1 1/2 tsp. of cinnamon, 1/2 tsp. of ginger, 1/4 tsp. cloves and 1/2 tsp of salt. Since you’re essentially making a custard, add your custard ingredients: 2 eggs, 1 can of evaporated milk (or 1 cup of whole milk or light cream) and 3/4 cup sugar. Everything should be nice and blended to pour into a deep unbaked pie crust. Bake in a preheated 350° F oven for 45 minutes to an hour depending on your oven and the depth of your pie. Check for firmness toward the end of the baking time (you want a firm custard), but don’t let the pumpkin filling over cook or scorch.

This is a great side dish, and is quite flexible regarding seasonings. With its naturally sweet profile, these squashes do well seasoned with sweet or savory flavors, or both. Curry, cinnamon, garlic, sage, ginger-all of these alone or in combination can work. You can even add some apple juice into the mix. This method takes more work than simply steaming and pureeing the squash, but I think it coaxes a lot more flavor out so I am willing to take the time. The sautéing caramelizes the squash and brings out the sweetness and nutty qualities, where a simple steaming or boiling may leave you with more of a “green” vegetable flavor.

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This dish is great as a side or as a base to stack things like cooked greens and grains on. I like to use a rack to cook these on so they can crisp on both sides, but if you don’t have a rack, just use a well oiled piece of foil on a sheet pan.

 

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This is a dish based on one I learned at Chez Panisse. The hardest part of the dish is peeling the squash.* Once that is done it goes together in a snap. I tend to go with savory seasonings, but you could use cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, and orange juice as seasoning as well. These spices would go fine with garlic and pepper. Speaking of garlic, you can use a good quality garlic powder instead of the fresh if you wish.

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This dish is usually made with a pumpkin, but other winter squash will work as well. Winter Carnival, Butternut, Orange Hokkaido will all work for this. Some squash, such as the Japanese “Kabocha” types tend to be a little drier than pumpkins and most other squash, so you may need to add some butter or olive oil to the squashed squash.

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This is the basic method for cooking winter squash either to eat as is, or to prep it for something else, like soup or as a ravioli or tortellini filling. This works for most winter squash, with the only variation being the times, which will change based on thickness of the squash.

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