Currently viewing the tag: "cauliflower"

This came about as a result of eating out and having pork cutlets with fried capers. The capers stole the show for me. One night I was craving the capers and had a different meat dish planned, so this came about. Be sure to dry the capers really well so they open out more and get crisp.

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If you wish to save time, you can skip sautéing the cauliflower, although it does add a great extra layer of flavor.

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This dish uses ingredients that commonly are found in dishes that get named “Persian”. This is a pretty dish with the white cauliflower tinged with the deep purple of the syrup, and then the scattering of creamy pine nuts and green mint. If you are not a fan of mint, substitute fresh marjoram and some flat leaf parsley.

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The Salsa Verde v.2 is yet another iteration of a favorite of mine. It is actually the first version I did, but another was posted first, hence the order change-up. This one has marjoram, and is probably the most versatile. Cooking the cauliflower at a slightly lower heat takes a little longer, but allows for a good crisping and prevents burning. Use a heavy skillet also.

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This salad uses two quickles (the carrots were a spin-off of the cauliflower) that, with a little study of the recipe, could be made all together, and you could reduce the volume of final product. Both the quickles are quite good, and last a long while in the refrigerator, so doing them both is a nice way to set yourself up for a couple weeks of crunchy sweet-tart vegetables that are easy to deploy. If lavender is not your thing, use the recipe for Cauliflower, Romanesco, and Carrot Quickles on site (which makes this simpler in that you do the carrots and cauliflower together, and the flavor is a more “traditional” pickle flavor), skipping the romanesco and celery and switching the dressing to a white wine vinaigrette with a very little rosemary in it along with some thyme and a hint of garlic.

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This dish can be made with cauliflower just as well. The one thing not to do is over-cook the Romanesco or cauliflower. It should be just tender, with a bit of crunch still to it. If you wish, you can pan sear the wedges of vegetable to add caramelized flavor.

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The pesto is on quotations because you can just toss a handful of basil and garlic into a blender and then add almonds for a quick pesto-ish mélange rather than making a full on batch of pesto. If you wanted to, you could toss in flat leaf parsley with the basil to stretch it, or you can even use pesto from a jar. You would still need to add almonds for the flavor they impart. This is here to use up the last of the season basil you might have in the garden, or in the refrigerator.

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This dish was somehow inspired by the classic tapa known as Tortilla Española. Don’t ask how, as I am not sure myself. The potatoes used are important here. Find something like a Yellow Finn or Yukon Gold, or other potato that possesses a slightly sweet and nutty flavor without being a really waxy type, nor really mealy. Potato size also matters. The idea is the potato and sauce work together to highlight each other’s flavor, while the tomato acts as a counterpoint with acid and fruit, and the parsley adds earthy and vegetal notes.

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This sauce is part of a steamed potatoes and tomato dish that was inspired by a Tortilla Española, but is can be used with other things as well. Try it with garbanzo beans, grilled shrimp, or as a dip for flatbreads and crudités. It would be good under poached eggs as well. By the way, this is the perfect way to use the core of the cauliflower.

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Serve this in bowls with slices of cheese toast. Add leftover chicken or grains such as farro or barley, or Israeli couscous.

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IMG_1376_zps603c9ebbThis is a hummus where the cauliflower stands in for the chickpeas, so it is lighter both in texture and flavor. The garlic is blanched as well so the sweetness of the cauliflower stands out, but if you like, feel free to use raw garlic for a more assertive flavor. Using garlic roasted in its skin would enhance the sweet and nutty flavor of the cauliflower while backing off the heat and breath enhancing qualities of raw garlic. Use this where you would traditional hummus.

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Pesto is a wonderful complement to roasted cauliflower. This recipe calls for thin shreds of carrots added to the pesto for a little hit of crunch and sweetness, but the recipe is great without the shreds if you do not have the time to prep the carrot shreds. Whatever nuts you use in the pesto would be the nuts to use to garnish this dish.

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“Condiment”? Well, it isn’t a pesto, nor is it a “salsa verde”. If you look up the word you will find this fits perfectly, as this mélange is something to give a particular flavor to, or to complement a dish. Here, the cilantro acts as a foil to the earthy sweet flavor of the roasted cauliflower, and the carrots help to point up the sweetness and adds a textural counterpoint.

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Serve this unlikely seeming combo as a tapa, appetizer, or side with grilled shrimp or chicken. The cauliflower will be a little sweet to contrast with the green grassy, sometimes spicy padrons, and the vinegar in the marinade will add piquancy to the whole. Use large crystal salt for an added layer of crunch. These would be good with a glass of chilled sherry. If you want to dress this up a bit, use the Charred Scallion Sauce on the website.

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Crisp sweet-tart apples make a nice foil to the nutty unctuous cauliflower. This is a dish where you want a fixed-blade slicer like the Ben-Riner, or a food processor with a ¼-inch slicer disc.

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Another recipe from the Quickles file. Cauliflower lends itself beautifully to this technique-it maintains it crisp texture yet no longer tastes raw, and the blend of lavender, fennel seed, and peppercorns brings out the sweetness of the cauliflower. The lavender will tint white cauliflower, but if you use purple cauliflower the color is even nicer. These are nice to serve as an appetizer or as a side to accompany braise and stews, roasts, burgers, or as part of a salad. They go really well with a dish of lentils topped with a poached egg. It turns out kids like them as well, and they last for quite a while in the refrigerator.

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The apple in this brings out the sweetness of the cauliflower, and the potato adds body and echoes the nutty flavors of cauliflower. The Apple Balsamic vinegar can be found in gourmet shops and better grocery stores. It is a syrupy vinegar made as Balsamic vinegar is made, but uses apple juice as a starting point rather than grape.

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Another dish where vegetables pose as a sauce. Here, cauliflower or Romanesco are cooked down with mushrooms and Purplette onions to make a sweet and earthy topping for fish, poached chicken, or tofu. This would work fine as a pasta sauce as well.

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This salad is a riff on a Salade Niçoise, with a Spanish bent.

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Another iteration of “Honey Lacquered Cauliflower”. This one is quite easy and gives a subtler variation to pan cooking it. It also yields a beautiful golden color, which orange cauliflower could accentuate. Marinating time is important to the success of this dish, so plan a little ahead so there is at least a half hour for marinating.

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This recipe produces a smooth textured broccoli that is a bit sweet and nutty tasting, with a lovely garlic perfume without the heat that garlic usually has. The secret is in the use of the garlic confit and the oil from that to slow poach the broccoli. This dish is a great base for a “sauce” for roasted fish such as halibut or salmon. This recipe can be used on cauliflower as well. One of the key elements to this dish is using low temperatures to avoid the swampy smell brassicas can emit.

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INGREDIENTS:

4-6 medium potatoes such as Desiree, Romanze, Sangre, or other firm starchy potato, cut into ½ to ¾ inch cubes (size should be similar to the cauliflower pieces)
1 head cauliflower, florets only, trimmed to around 1 inch (halve in needed)
Olive oil as needed
Salt and pepper to taste

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If you use purple cauliflower the look will match the aroma and taste for an interesting brain teaser, although this is good with any color cauliflower you have. Just be sure to not overcook the cauliflower when you blanch it. The Kimes Apiary grade C honey was excellent for this as the high moisture content allows it to coat really well, but any quality honey will do, although you might need to add a little water to help it spread out to coat the vegetable. Be sure to use a honey that is complementary to the lavender though, or at least will not conflict with it.

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The flavors of this dish showcase the sweet and nutty flavor cauliflower possesses, which is best brought out by roasting. The idea of marinating vegetables may seem odd, but many are quite receptive to marinades. Although the flavors work fine with any color cauliflower, a white or yellow cauliflower will pick up a lovely color from the saffron and Pimenton de la Vera used in the marinade.

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This is a fast and loose interpretation of a Thai “yellow curry”. Be sure not to cook the vegetables to long or they will get mushy and unpleasant. This dish has some heat to it as written, but if you prefer it mild, simply omit the chilis. If you do not have Thai basil, substitute cilantro or mint. If you like your food spicy, substitute in 1/2 cup of Cilantro Chili Sauté Juice for a half cup of the stock.

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Here, cauliflower gets treated the way meat is often cooked in restaurants-started in a pan to brown and finished in the oven. Faster than roasting with deeper browning outside while the inside stays firmer. It is then “dressed” with ingredients long associated with Sicilian cooking-capers and chili flakes, and some vinegar.

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This is a dish with lots of big, aggressive flavors contrasting with the sweetness of the cauliflower. Goes well with roast chicken, burgers, grilled chops, or sausages.

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Click for cauliflower recipes

As an excellent source of vitamin C, and a very good source of manganese, cauliflower provides us with two core antioxidants. The grafitti (purple) and cheddar (orange) cauliflower varieties are beautiful to look at and just as tasty.

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Kind of like mac ‘n’ cheese, but with cauliflower instead of noodles. This would be a good dish to make after entertaining and finding you have a bunch of small bits of cheese. Cheddar and Gruyere are used here for depth of flavor, but other Swiss and Cheddar types would work as well.

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The trick to this dish is to simmer it gently so the cauliflower and potatoes don’t overcook. The cauliflower should be cooked through, but still retain some toothsome texture. Reducing the stock with the fennel and leeks adds flavor. Use a waxy potato rather than something like a Russet so the potato does not disintegrate and turn to mush.

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