Currently viewing the tag: "cheese"

The escarole melts into the onions and adds a nice mildly bitter foil to the sweetness of the onions and the yellow fleshed potatoes. You could use cream in lieu of the stock for richer gratin. To make an all-in-one dish, add ham or bacon.

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Sometimes simple is best. If you want to add a little more dimension to this, New Natives grows broccoli microgreens which perfectly straddle the line between arugula and almond, and will add loft to the salad. Gorgonzola Dolce is a sweeter version of Gorgonzola, but if you cannot find it, just use Gorgonzola.

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Crunchy topped vegetable studded gooey goodness. What’s not to like? And if you have carnivores to deal with, add in crumbled Italian sausage, bacon, or ham and you will make them quite happy.

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This is a riff on a recipe from NoMAd by Daniel Humm and Will Guidara. I like how the dish explores the different textures of broccoli and different flavors based on temperature. The recipe takes a little bit of work, but no more than most people lavish on a meat course for a weekend dinner. So why not spend that attention on vegetables? Much of this work can be done ahead of time, with the cutting and fricco being done the day before, along with the steaming of the florets. You want broccoli with long stems for this recipe.

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Simple, basic, and full of flavors. Eat this as a salad off a plate or pile it onto very hot crostini so the heat can melt the cheese a little and wilt the arugula. Use using oil with a soft bite but big fruity flavor is a good idea here so it softens the bite of the arugula and doesn’t mask the nuttiness of the favas.

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This salad has plenty of crunch along with lots of flavor thanks to the quickled leeks, arugula, and dressing. You could add beets and/or a cheese like feta along with some pistachios maybe, but don’t add too many extras or the salad will become confusing to the palate and the flavors will be muddied.

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An autumnal salad that is pretty to look at and tastes of the coming season. The ingredients act as foils and links all at the same time, and form a sort of flavor merry-go-round with each other. If you wish, you can add diced apples for more sweetness and crunch to the salad. See the “option” in the recipe.

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INGREDIENTS:

2 large, 4 medium Delicata squash, split lengthwise and cleaned

½ pound lean ground lamb or beef

2 cups zucchini, cut into fine dice

¼ cup onion, cut into fine dice

1 cup chard stems, cut into fine dice, washed and dried

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Eggs in Hell, or Purgatory sometimes, are eggs poached in tomato sauce that can be mild of flaming hot. I think the name comes from the look-little islands of sunny yellow and white in a sea of lava-like tomato. The smell will be anything but brimstone-like as long as the eggs are fresh. This makes a great breakfast (some say the name is derived because it is thought to be a hangover curative) or light dinner. Use a spoon to scoop the eggs and sauce onto thick slices of grilled rustic bread. The “Spanish Style” comes from the use of pimenton and padrons.

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This is a twist on the classic Insalata Caprese, with good fresh mozzarella torn or cut into small bits and paired with a cold tomato coulis instead of slices of tomato. The basil appears as an oil, or thin shreds. It can served on a plate, or in a bowl or even a glass. For an elegant appetizer.

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This is one of those salads similar to the Moroccan type, where there is no lettuce, the dish can be served to start a meal or as a side, or can make part of a light supper with a little soup and a more traditional salad of lettuces. Next time you are out for Chinese or Japanese food and they have the better quality bamboo chopsticks that are almost pencil thick, ask for a set to use for dishes like this, where you need to slice down without cutting all the way through something.

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Another item inspired by a trip to a taqueria. This time it was a plate of tacos, with the charred meat, lettuce, tomatoes, and green onions that led to this. I really like the surprise of grilled lettuce with the hot/cold contrast and the play of flavors the lettuce gains from the light charring from the grill. There are plenty of fun options that can be added to the salad listed to add interest as well. Having a spritzer for your oil makes this dish simpler, and keeps it lighter.

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The combination of early season favas and mint is a vibrant flavor that speaks of spring. Young favas and romano cheese are a classic pairing, so romano is used in the risotto instead of the usual parmesan. If you have some very thin asparagus spears, you could cut a few diagonally into half-inch lengths and blanch them until just barely done and add them with the favas. Be sure to add the mint just before serving or it will turn dark and lose some of its brightness.

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Very simple but satisfying. A little char, cool bits contrasting with warm bits, crunchy and silky. The garlic dressing has the perfume and taste of garlic, but none of the heat. The “Grilled or Creamy” refers to the dressing having two iterations; one where you grill the garlic, the other where you blanch it briefly, then add thick yogurt to the pureé.

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I love gratins. I like to experiment with various ingredients and see how well they go together. Knowing that celeriac and potatoes go well as a mash, I was pretty sure this would work well also. It sure does. This light version of a gratin does not use cream or cheese.

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Finding different ways to use celery leaves besides sticking them in stock is a “chef thing”. Here is a dual recipe. Chopped, it makes a condiment to be used as you might Salsa Verde. Chopped finer in food processor you get a pesto like paste that can be used on pasta, or on slabs of cheese or smeared onto things. For pasta, try it with something like bucatini or try a whole grain noodle with a little more chew and deeper flavor. Barilla makes a “Plus” line that is made with spelt and barley, chickpeas and lentils, as well as semolina, that has a nice flavor that would go well with this recipe. Try it on fish or poultry-it would go well with turkey for instance. Use as a smear for the white meat or use on sandwiches of leftovers later.

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The pesto is on quotations because you can just toss a handful of basil and garlic into a blender and then add almonds for a quick pesto-ish mélange rather than making a full on batch of pesto. If you wanted to, you could toss in flat leaf parsley with the basil to stretch it, or you can even use pesto from a jar. You would still need to add almonds for the flavor they impart. This is here to use up the last of the season basil you might have in the garden, or in the refrigerator.

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The roasted tomatoes can actually done a day or two ahead. They are the sort of thing you can do if you find yourself with a surfeit, and can be used for pasta, in salads, pureed for a sauce or a soup.

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Prosciutto works just fine here as well the Serrano ham, and is much less expensive. Regular arugula can stand in for the wild, and if you don’t have Petite Basque or Manchego handy, go with buffalo mozzarella. If you wish to be authentically Spanish, use sherry vinegar for the onions and Serrano ham. Going Italian? Use balsamic vinegar and mozzarella with Prosciutto.

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One of the simplest ways I know to enjoy tomatoes is this quick and very traditional Mediterranean snack. I first made this when inspired by a description I read in a book by Lawrence Durrell if I recall correctly. I have since seen it in many other places. There is no set recipe. It is a technique. I suppose a 1:1 ratio of medium tomato to slab of toast might work.

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Cocque are a Spanish flatbread equivalent to pizza, but are usually more rustic. Typically the crust is thin, or really thin, and is crisper and blisters a little. The toppings are fewer, but always choice. Cocque appear as part of the tapas pantheon, or as a starter or snack with drinks, not as a main dish. You can use whatever peppers you want, but if using the Hungarian Wax peppers you might want to nibble a few to check for heat.

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This “sauce” is made from broccoli cooked until very tender and then mashed or pureed. For the polenta, you can use either soft cooked polenta, or use the rolls of hard cooked polenta and grill the slices, or simply oil them up and roast or broil them in the oven.

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Use this as an appetizer or party food.

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From Chef Colin Moody

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From Chef Colin Moody:

Makes about 2/3 cup

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Serve this salad at room temperature or lightly chilled. If you wish, you can skip the lettuces and use this as a “salad” in the Moroccan sense- one of several room temperature vegetable dishes served first and then with the main part of the meal.

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Depending on the cheese you use, this can be sort of light and cheesy, or you can make it nice and gooey with plenty of chew to it. For the latter, use a mixture of provolone and mozzarella with a little parmesan or romano thrown in for flavor depth. You could also use a sharp cheddar if you wish, and add some bacon if you are feeding carnivores who typically eschew vegetables.

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This dish can be eaten hot or room temperature, as an appetizer or as a light main dish with a salad or soup. You can use other greens in this as well, such as arugula or spinach, and it is a great way to use greens that look less than perfect. If you do not have leeks, use onion. Garlic cloves can substitute for green garlic. The scamorza is a type of smoked mozzarella. If you do not have it, just use regular mozzarella and add Pimenton de la Vera, or smoked paprika from Spain.

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Although you can buy things called balsamic reductions, or balsamic condiment or glaze, all over the place now, a good many of them are made with inferior, or downright lousy, balsamic vinegar, or not even true balsamic vinegar. A lot of them have caramel, sugar, or other things added to them. Some of these things are for flavoring, others are to thicken.

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This light soup celebrates spring. If you have asparagus, add some 1/8th inch bias cut slices and you have all the local vegetable harbingers of the season. This recipe is more of a guideline, really. Feel free to play with it. You could just add the chard stems to the liquid, but the sautéing brings out sweetness in the stems, and wilting the chard in a separate pan gives a lighter, cleaner flavor to the broth. The fava greens are the tips of the plants, including some of the flowers.  Add mushrooms, carrot shreds, whatever you find.

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