Currently viewing the tag: "dressing"

This dressing was originally intended for the Arugula, Radish, Avocado, Breadcrumb Salad.

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Here is another vinaigrette where tomato is the flavor. Use flavorful tomatoes, or your dressing will just be a reddish vegetal tasting vinaigrette.

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This is for a salad featuring crisp shaved radishes and turnips, but would be great on cold poached salmon, or hot grilled salmon. Try it with shrimp, or a Mediterranean themed poached chicken salad with arugula, frisée, etc. Although the recipe calls for Meyer lemons, you can use Eurekas. Just watch for the level of tartness.

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The creamy part of this dressing derives from yogurt. Use this dressing with beet and kale salads, cucumbers, with chicken, or shredded carrot and lettuce salads.

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Here’s a riff on the more forward flavored Charred Scallion Vinaigrette. The yogurt softens the “charred” flavor, and the basil combines with the charred scallion to yield a flavor reminiscent of a wood-fired pizza with a thin crust nicely charred in spots. Use for drizzling on grilled summer squash, or dipping crudité or hot grilled or cold steamed shrimp.

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Use this for South West inflected slaw, for a dip for vegetables or chips, or however. This was made for a slaw to go on a fried chicken sandwich.

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This is a dressing based on a sauce posted before. The trick is to char, not to burn the scallions. This flavor strikes some as odd at first, but there is something about it, maybe the primal fire-pit thing makes b.b.q. irresistible, which makes this dressing very appealing. It goes well with bold and earthy flavors, such as the radish escarole salad, or with a grass-fed beef steak salad. Keep it handy for dipping vegetables into or anointing sandwiches with, or drizzling on firm fleshed fish, shrimp, and eggs.

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This dressing is for a salad of soft lettuces and strawberries, but would go with cold pasta salad with tomato and cucumber, with cold chicken for a hot summer day, poached salmon hot or cold, or something with cabbage or kales, as well as salads made up of Romaine or Little Gems.

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This is the dressing that goes with the above named recipe, but this, or any number of variants, could go with any salad of dense leaves such as the cabbages, kales, or things like mei quin choi or shredded carrot or celeriac. Lighter in oil, this recipe will not emulsify like a regular vinaigrette. Adding mustard will help the salad thicken, but be careful what mustard you use and how much lest you blow out the dressing and just have a thin and pungent mustard garnish for the salad.

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This dressing is to with the Arugula, Dried Apricots, and Pistachio salad, but it can be used with other components as well. Try with Butterleaf or oak leaf lettuces with plenty of sprouts.

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Westernized variations of traditional Japanese dips and sauces. For the Tuna Tobiko Cucumber dish, use sparingly. You can use this for sashimi, as a noodle dip, or on a salad.

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Use port you are drinking, or buy a mid-range port if you wish. Don’t buy a great vintage just for this dressing, but don’t buy something really cheap, and NEVER buy “cooking” port or wine. Typically, any wine product labelled “cooking” will have salt in it. This was to discourage chefs of old from drinking the wine, but it was also made with inferior wine You could use hazel nuts and hazel nut oil if you wish as well.

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When you want the refinement and acid of sherry vinegar, but want a little sweetness too, this is the dressing.

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This is more of a condiment than a salad dressing, and has salsa verde as its inspiration. Try it on toasts with arugula, avocado, and radishes, or on grilled chicken, or eggs.

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This dressing was concocted for the Arugula, Radish, and Strawberry salad originally, so calls for good quality ingredients as well as a neutral flavored oil such as grapeseed.

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This variation of rémoulade uses juice from grilled lemons, and adds some sharper mustard to add a smoky quality while adding to the zip. The marjoram adds a sweet freshness that counters the earthy qualities of celeriac and asparagus and brings out the sweetness of these vegetables.

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Grilling a lemon just adds a certain je ne sais quoi to lemons where juice is going to be used. There is a certain smoky char that is faint but there, and the juice seems sweeter. This dressing was made for a salad with grilled zucchini and tomatoes and mint, so the bit of sweetness acts as a foil to the acid in the tomatoes and the slight bitterness of the squash.

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INGREDIENTS:

1 small clove garlic, peeled

½ teaspoon minced/pulverized shallot

Salt and pepper to taste

1 pinch of fresh thyme leaves, minced, or a smallish pinch of dried thyme leaves

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This dressing will have plenty of garlic flavor without the heat raw garlic can lend to things. Garlic chives are a flat bladed chive which pack plenty of garlic flavor. Use this dressing with sturdy lettuces and bold flavors.

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This was first done for a salad of beets, a peppery cress, arugula, and shreds of Little Gem lettuce. It will go with plenty of other salads of sharp or spicy elements, as well as on pork chops or chicken. Use a milder olive oil, and be sure to use organic oranges with plenty of flavor and some acid. Organic because you want to rub the bowl with the orange skin to flavor the dressing.

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INGREDIENTS:

1½ tablespoons rice vinegar

1½ tablespoons water

1 teaspoon sugar

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Grilling a lemon just adds a certain je ne sais quoi to lemons where juice is going to be used. There is a certain smoky char that is faint but there, and the juice seems sweeter. This dressing was made for a salad with grilled zucchini and tomatoes and mint, so the bit of sweetness acts as a foil to the acid in the tomatoes and the slight bitterness of the squash.

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You can make this dressing with whatever peppers you wish, but avoid mixing colors or risk winding up with an unappetizing shade of blech. Also, if you use spicy peppers and this is a dressing for a salad, consider using some mild peppers in there to mitigate the heat. If you are making this as a condiment to drizzle onto a plate, go for it.

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From Chef Susan Pasko

This is one of those super quick blender dressings….
No whisking, no drizzling, no fuss.  Very versatile.

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Fattoush dressings, like many other Mid-East dressings are loose with a higher acid to oil ratio than French influenced vinaigrettes. There are many, many variations, just as the salad itself varies from place to place. The main difference between v.1 and v.2 is the addition of pomegranate molasses. This brings a deep flavor that has a haunting/addictive tart and almost smoky note to it. Some brands have a little caramel added, and this will lend a little sweetness and a little more of the smoky note. Look for Mid-East and Cortas brands. The latter is tarter.

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This dressing goes with a salad of strawberries, lettuce, and pepitas, as well as with a dice of corn, red onion, bell peppers, and cilantro. Sauté it or use raw and dress with this vinaigrette. Use this vinaigrette to dress fish tacos or pulled pork sandwiches. Although the roasted garlic is an extra step, the flavor really is subtler than raw garlic, and the roasted garlic adds a creamy texture to the dressing.

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This is a super simple slaw dressing that works with the Broccoli Slaw recipe, or any other slaw type salad with assertive flavors like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, or beets. This is the closest thing to the dressings on slaws in grocery store deli’s I can come up with.

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This dressing was designed for Broccoli Slaw, but will enhance many other things that that have a bit of peppery bite or assertive flavor, such as dishes with cauliflower, cabbage, arugula, cress, and the like. This iteration is a little lighter than v.2 as it uses less mayonnaise, and a little more oil.

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Meant originally for Salad of Butter Lettuce, Beets, and Broccoli, this is a simple and very versatile dressing. Goes well with earthy foods, or anything bland that needs a little perking up without overwhelming the base food.

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Here is a simple yet flavorful dressing perfect for beets or other earthy elements in salads. It would go well with Middle Eastern spiced foods, or make a nice chicken salad. Although it says “Creamy” in the title, there is not much, and it is yogurt or mayonnaise based on your preference. The yogurt will be a little more tart and bright, the mayo makes for a lighter and subtler dressing.

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