Currently viewing the tag: "fish"

Mayonnaise is used for simplicity, as well as for its wonderful ability to brown up and form a nice glaze. If you wish for something lower calorie and lower cholesterol, you can use whipped egg whites instead, although it may not brown nearly as well. You could whip the whites and fold in the whisked yolk if you want loft and richness as well. If you do not have green garlic, just use a single clove of garlic minced or just season the pan by cooking the whole clove in the oil you’ll cook the spinach in. Don’t have oyster mushrooms? Don’t worry about it. Cook ¼ of a finely diced white or yellow onion and cook it until soft before adding spinach. Although the recipe looks long, it is really not. There are just lots of tips to ensure this is an easy dish.

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This is for a salad featuring crisp shaved radishes and turnips, but would be great on cold poached salmon, or hot grilled salmon. Try it with shrimp, or a Mediterranean themed poached chicken salad with arugula, frisée, etc. Although the recipe calls for Meyer lemons, you can use Eurekas. Just watch for the level of tartness.

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For this recipe you will need to find a Japanese market or a good fish market. In the Santa Cruz/Watsonville area you can find what you need at Yamashita Market in Watsonville. As the tuna is served raw, be careful in your selection. This recipe is a contrast of crunches and a synthesis of flavors. The tobiko pop, the cucumber crunches, and the tuna sort of melts and has a little chew to it at the same time. The clean wet taste of cucumber harmonizes with the briny roe while acting as a foil to the saltiness. The sweet, slightly oily, and umami flavors of the tuna are set off by the other elements. The dressing is used sparingly, as a surprise accent that pops up as a little jolt of bass-line to the rest of the salads higher notes of flavor. This is an appetizer, or part of a string of dishes. The recipe is written as a small appetizer-just a few bites, as in 3-4. If you wish a bit more, double the volume.

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This is a riff on a classic of Italian cuisine, only it has kale in it, because, y’know, it’s kale, and besides being good for you, it tastes good raw. As long as it is fairly tender and young. I find that crumpling kale leaves seems to result in a reaction that makes the leaves sweeter, so be vigorous while prepping the kale here. This is a salad that can be done quickly, especially if you are practiced at stripping the stems out of kale with your fingers, and your favas are already done or you skip them.

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The cress and quickles have a sharp quality the acts as a foil to the richness of the fish, and the sweetness of the quickles adds extra depth to the flavors. Crunch from the pine nuts and the creaminess they possess rounds everything out and talks with the butter used on the fish to link the two together.

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The topping is what makes this a special dish, and that is due in great part to the unexpected hit of the lavender playing with the fennel. Clean and delicate with a light funk from leeks and green garlic, the topping brings out the meaty qualities of halibut without muzzling the sweetness. If you have the topping done ahead of time this is a dish that might take as little as 15-20 minutes to make.

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This topping grew out of another recipe used on salmon. This is a little more subtle, and more floral with the addition of the fennel seeds and lavender. While made initially for seared halibut, it would go nicely with pork chops, chicken, or other firm fleshed white fish. It can be tossed with kale or other greens as well, or stirred into grains such as farro or barley.      

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This is not so much a recipe as it is a whole around a few ingredients. These are variations of a favorite breakfast/lunch/snack/light dinner with salad, party appetizer of mine. The core of this “dish” is a sushi roll called the Norway Roll from when I had a sushi bar which was cucumber sticks, thin slices of smoked salmon and Meyer lemon, the dill cream cheese, and dill scattered on the outside of the roll.

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The Silk Robe refers to the silky texture leeks, fennel, and carrots take on when cooked slowly. You can grill the salmon, or roast it high or low temperature as you wish, or cook it entirely in a pan on the stovetop. Each method gives a different but delicious result. Higher temps yield a crispy part of the fish, where a slow and low cooking results in a supple and silky fish that matches the vegetable topping. Pan searing gives a crisp top deck and low oven heat yields silky flesh to meld with the topping. Because there are so few ingredients here, and cooking is so simple, be sure to use only the best ingredients. You could use halibut or other thick bodied flaky fish for this recipe, or even slowly poached chicken.

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This recipe was made to go with Crisp Pan Roasted Salmon, but will go with roast chicken as well as seared scallops, black cod, or pork chops. Leeks cook to a silky texture similar to escarole, and the earthy funk combines well with the slightly bitter escarole. Although the recipe calls for white wine or sherry vinegar, a white balsamic or a good quality red wine vinegar would go great here as well. If you do go with red wine vinegar, serve a red wine that has plenty of fruit, but also some tannins to match the vinegar and act as a foil to the rich salmon and the smoothness of the vegetables. You could also toss this with pasta or grains such as farro.

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Using a slightly leaner salmon is a good strategy for this dish as the leeks and escarole have enough fatty qualities already. The Japanese peppers mentioned are fushimi and/or shishito peppers, which are quite mild but have a pleasantly “green” flavor. Searing adds another dimension of flavor that enhances the whole dish. Add shavings of carrot to the leeks and escarole (see recipe) or cook using a roll-cut and plate on the side. You can make this recipe using roast or grilled chicken or pork chops as well, but in this case the escarole-leeks will bring the richness instead of the salmon.

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When cooking fish there are two things to remember. “Fresh!” And -“Eight minutes to the inch”.

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Modern American cuisine smacks into traditional Mediterranean. This salad was inspired by a Salade Niçoise, but is much, much simpler. You want to use good quality tuna for this-at least use albacore if you can’t find any European tuna packed in olive oil. Also, If you have beans you have cooked yourself the dish will be better for them, but the recipe simply calls for pantry staple canned white beans. Rinse them really well.

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Poaching the salmon the night before makes this a quick dish to assemble after work or if company is coming and you want to spend time with them rather than the stove. Actually, pretty much all the prep can be done the day prior, and all you do is assemble things just before serving. Since this can be a knife and fork type salad, you can leave the lettuce in leaves if you wish instead of tearing them into bite-sized bits.

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Use this as a bed for grilled fish or chicken. Be sure to just warm the cabbage and give it a little color, but not to cook it through. This dish is about contrasts of textures and flavors.

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A slightly chunky vinaigrette with a bright, funky aroma, this dressing works on salads and is excellent as a topping for grilled fish such as snapper, tilapia, or halibut. Use with pork medallions, chicken with cumin and oregano, or even on noodles like ramen tossed with vegetables and leftover shredded meat.

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This is a riff on a very famous sauce from the Troisgros restaurant in Roanne, France. It was one of the dishes that launched Nouvelle Cuisine. This version is simplified, and lightened a little from the original. Use it on fish (salmon was the original fish used), shellfish (scallops, lobster, shrimp), or on poached or slow roasted chicken breasts. Sorrel has a refreshing lemony tart/sour quality that is great with richer things like salmon and cream.

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Use this with grilled Little Gem Lettuces, or other salads, or dollop onto sandwiches or whole rye toasts with cold smoked salmon. The flavor and perfume of garlic will be abundant, but none of the heat.

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You can do this with swordfish as well, and you can cook your fish in the oven if you wish.

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This dish compounds the flavor of fennel by using it in multiple forms-bulb, fronds, seeds, and in the liquor from southern France known locally as pastis.

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Here is one use for the stalks of fennel that recipes always tell you to “reserve for another use”. Putting the salmon on the stalks of fennel allows the fish to cook a little more gently, preventing drying out and also imparting a subtle fennel flavor tinged with a bit of smoke. Top the fish with Quick Braised Fennel for Fish or Chicken to compound the flavors, and then if you wish, to take it further, put the salmon in a large bowl with braised vegetables such as carrots and cauliflower and then ladle Fennel Broth (see recipe) around the fish, top with braised fennel and drizzle with olive oil and serve.

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The part of this dish that takes the longest is making the carrot sauce, and that should take no more than 20-25 minutes. Halibut is used here, but feel free to substitute any firm fish.

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This dish is pretty simple. The trickiest part is mounting the sauce with butter and not breaking the sauce. This is easily avoided by simply paying attention and pulling the pan from the heat while adding (mounting) the butter, returning it to the heat if the pan cools too much. The sauce is a little tart and goes well with the fish. By not turning the fish before putting it in the oven the fish will develop a very crisp crust on the top, which is a perfect foil to the buttery sauce. White pepper is used in the sauce because it looks better, and the flavor is better suited to the sauce.

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This dressing is for a shaved fennel salad, but the fennel would make this a nice dressing to top grilled fish or pork chops. You could make the fennel salad without the lettuce and use this dressing with it for topping the aforementioned.

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This is a riff on a sandwich I had in San Francisco at the De Young museum. If you make this during tomato season, by all means add a couple thin slices of tomato to the sandwich.

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This is my take on something I learned in cooking school. Fujian cuisine is known for full flavored yet light dishes that showcase the main ingredients. The area is also known for wet dishes such as soups, stews, and braises, as well as seafood, along with an emphasis on umami flavoring. This dish hits all those points. The chicken version is another dish that uses a store bought roasted chicken or left-overs. This dish goes together pretty quickly.

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This does not use as much oil as a standard vinaigrette, so is much lighter. Excellent on cucumbers or a “slaw” of savoy or nappa cabbage with grated carrots. For sesame oil, I favor Kadoya brand for its pure clean flavor and aroma. If you can find it, try the Black Sesame seed oil for a deeper flavor. Using a blender for this dressing makes it a snap, although shaking it up in a quart jar with a tight fitting lid is good too.

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This dressing is about the tomato, so only do this when you have tomatoes with plenty of flavor. This is also a pretty dressing, especially when you have different colors of tomatoes. This dressing has a nice combination of fruitiness, acid, and sweetness, and is great on fish, grilled shrimp, chicken, or mixed with arugula and tossed onto grilled slabs of chewy bread. It is good on salads, too.

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This dish is so simple, there is nowhere for inferior ingredients to hide. The dressing goes really well with grilled or sautéed swordfish, halibut, tuna, or other meaty textured fish with a clean sea taste. This treatment works well with grilled shrimp, scallops, and with chicken breasts also.

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Another dish where vegetables pose as a sauce. Here, cauliflower or Romanesco are cooked down with mushrooms and Purplette onions to make a sweet and earthy topping for fish, poached chicken, or tofu. This would work fine as a pasta sauce as well.

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