Currently viewing the tag: "herbs"

This was a quick dish thrown together with what happened to be at the front of refrigerator, and it was a big hit.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This recipe is for a condiment made of Corno de Toro and Hungarian peppers, but you could use other types if you wish. Use this to top sandwiches, grilled meats or fish such as swordfish or halibut, or on sausages.

Continue reading »

This recipe contrasts the slightly bitter silkiness of escarole with the nutty sweetness of potatoes that have been sautéed crisp, with onions forming a bridge. This dish makes a nice side with sausages, ham steaks, and other sweet and rich meats.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

These quick pickled beets can be seasoned with whatever herbs or spices will suit your palate or recipe. For this recipe, the quickling solution is heated up and the beets lightly cook in it while absorbing the flavors. Use these in salads, sandwiches, and as a side to a main course.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

These are great straight out of the refrigerator, or make for a great salad, which is what they were first made for.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish can be eaten hot or room temperature, as an appetizer or as a light main dish with a salad or soup. You can use other greens in this as well, such as arugula or spinach, and it is a great way to use greens that look less than perfect. If you do not have leeks, use onion. Garlic cloves can substitute for green garlic. The scamorza is a type of smoked mozzarella. If you do not have it, just use regular mozzarella and add Pimenton de la Vera, or smoked paprika from Spain.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The part of this dish that takes the longest is making the carrot sauce, and that should take no more than 20-25 minutes. Halibut is used here, but feel free to substitute any firm fish.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a riff on a sandwich I had in San Francisco at the De Young museum. If you make this during tomato season, by all means add a couple thin slices of tomato to the sandwich.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish is about the contrast between the bright lemon, and the mild spice of the radish and mizuna, both as a foil to the chewy and nutty flavor of the farro.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

If your turnips come with the greens on, remove the stems and wash the leaves, tear into bite-sized pieces, then add to the pan to wilt just before adding the dressing, or cook the greens separately and put on the plate first, the add the turnips and mushrooms, then dress.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing delivers a dressing full of smoky garlic flavor without the heat of clove garlic. Once the season for green garlic is past, you could grill thin leeks and a clove or two garlic instead for a good alternative. As well as topping sautéed or grilled vegetables, it will complement salads of sturdy lettuces like romaine and things like escarole, endive, and radicchio.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This gratin is for those who love the flavor of garlic. The nice thing about this is that using the green garlic gives you lots of flavor but leaves the pungent heat behind.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a nice and light dish with bright flavors. If you have green garlic, be sure to use some of that in the filling. Button mushrooms will work fine in lieu of oyster mushrooms, but avoid shiitake as they will take over the dish.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish can be made with any beets you wish. If you have red beets, and fuyu persimmons, this is a great combination, both for flavor and visuals. The contrast of cold persimmon and hot beets is another layer of interest. This dish can be served as a side or starter, but is hearty enough to be a main course, although the flavors are bright. This recipe was inspired by a dish from Gramercy Tavern.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use this dressing with the Little Gems, Feta, Red Onion Quickles salad, or anything with orange or pistachios in it. You could use this dress lentil salads, or scallop dishes as well.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Pistachio oil is pricey, but is a wonderful indulgence. It works magic in dressings, lentils, and grains, and is a nice way to finish scallops or fish. It matches well with orange and other citrus. Look for smaller bottles and keep it in the refrigerator. If you do not have pistachio oil, just use a plain red wine vinaigrette.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing goes with the Filet Beans, Radish, and Butter Leaf Salad, but will go with lots of other things as well. Salads and light slaws will pair with this, but this will also be good with cold shrimp and cold smoked or cured salmon as well as chicken dishes.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This recipe involves cooking tomatoes, onions, and garlic down to a jam-like consistency and tossing blanched broccoli in the sauce to coat. The recipe may make more than you need for the broccoli, and if that is the case, just freeze the remainder and use it on pasta, other vegetables or use it coat roasted chicken, fish, or shrimp.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a simple dish with satisfying flavors. The center of the tomato is grated and used to form a glaze for cabbage. Depending on the tomato, a pinch of sugar or a dash of vinegar might be called for to create balance in the flavors.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Here, farro stands in for the rice in a little chewier, earthier rendition of risotto. Farrotto may actually predate risotto. This iteration, with the chard and plenty of garlic is quite down-to-earth, but you can use the same technique with mushrooms or lemon zest and juice to make it lighter flavored.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish is a medley of concentrated late-summer flavors. The fresh tomatoes are cooked down to concentrate their sweetness, and the polenta is made from stock made from corn cobs which really brightens its flavor.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use this dressing where you might use a Louie (1000 Island type) dressing, or with seafood. This recipe was designed to go with the Romaine Salad with Seafood and Shellfish Dressing, which includes instructions for saving the liquid from draining tomatoes. If you are using tomatoes, and have the liquid from them as they drain, great! Use it for flavor and color. If not, don’t worry about it.  

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Lacinato, also called cavolo nero (black cabbage), is a kale that benefits from long cooking. Its deep flavor and sturdy texture blend well with the chewy quality and sweet flavor of farro. This dish can be cooked with extra liquid to make a soupy dish, or cooked until dry as here. You could put the finished dish into an oiled gratin dish and crack eggs into it and bake it with cheese for a light entrée, or toss in sausage for a one pot meal.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

When done with sweet tomatoes, these taste like candy, and are great as a dessert, or part of one. They work great with homemade vanilla ice cream or as part of a tart. I usually use plum tomatoes, but others will work as well. If the tomato is big, quarter it. This is less a recipe than a technique to follow. As you do this a couple times, you learn to adapt to the size of the tomatoes and the sweetness, or not, of them as well. You can change the herbs, play with oils, and even use different sugars such as a vanilla or lavender sugar.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

An all-vegetable and grain stuffing makes this lighter than the usual version with ground beef stuffing. This is a great way to use up left-over grains such as farro, bulgur, rice, or quinoa.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is about the tomato, so only do this when you have tomatoes with plenty of flavor. This is also a pretty dressing, especially when you have different colors of tomatoes. This dressing has a nice combination of fruitiness, acid, and sweetness, and is great on fish, grilled shrimp, chicken, or mixed with arugula and tossed onto grilled slabs of chewy bread. It is good on salads, too.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dish is so simple, there is nowhere for inferior ingredients to hide. The dressing goes really well with grilled or sautéed swordfish, halibut, tuna, or other meaty textured fish with a clean sea taste. This treatment works well with grilled shrimp, scallops, and with chicken breasts also.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a flavorful mélange that is not wet enough to be a soup, but not dry, either. Although you could easily add more liquid for a soup or cook it dry as a side dish.

Continue reading »

This dish plays up the sweetness of the cabbage, while the fennel and tarragon work in harmony to perfume the dish. The lemon adds a brightness to the dish that lightens the whole thing.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Although this dish originally was made to stuff chicken, it is quite good on it’s own as a side dish. The goat cheese is a nice option, but the dish is fine without it. Pine nuts work well in lieu of pistachios. This stuffing works great in whole chickens, chicken breasts, pork chops, fish, or even big pasta shells.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

SIGN UP FOR CSA PROGRAM

When you join our CSA, you sign up with the farm to receive a share of the harvest during our 36 week season from mid-March to mid-November. In return, you get a weekly box of organic vegetables and fruit (and optional flowers) delivered straight from our farm to a pick-up site in your neighborhood.

Signup for the CSA program >

View our CSA Members Page

This is where you can go to find out what's coming in your box each week, find recipes, identify your vegetables with pictures, and view or print the current and past newsletters. Check here for the information you need to use your box to the fullest.

Visit the CSA Members Page >