Currently viewing the tag: "kale"

This dish combines two basic dishes where the sum is definitely more than the parts. This is easily varied, and could be a good breakfast or light dinner with the addition of some fried eggs with crispy edges.

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These can be done in stages ahead of time up to the final cooking if you wish, and they are quite flexible in terms of what you use. Instead of lamb and currants, use pork and a fine dice of apples. Skip the meat entirely and add in some cheese, firm or pressed tofu, or chopped nuts.

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This is the sort of thing that can be thrown together with help from the pantry and leftovers, and is just right for a cold evening or lunch time. Or, if like me you are tired of cereal or omelets for breakfast, fire this up and add a couple poached or basted eggs on top and enjoy. You can also skip the eggs and have a piece of toast spread with some soft goat cheese smoked olive oil and you have a complete protein breakfast.

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With the orange squash and almost black ribbons of lacinato, this dish is great for Halloween parties, although anytime is a good time for these flavors. It is great as a side dish with poultry, pork, and sausage, or add grains and mushrooms to it for a hearty vegetarian main course.

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Quite easy, with big flavor. The sweetness of the tomatoes and mint, and the clean aromatic “whiffiness” are a great foil to the earthy kale. This dish would be fine with other kales as well as collards cut into ¼ inch ribbons.

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Another kale salad, and I think it’s a good one. The process of crumpling the kale does something that makes the kale sweeter, and the beets match the earthiness of the kale. The cucumbers add a nice hit of cool moisture that goes well with the dry salt flavor of the pistachios.

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This is a great way to get more vegetables into your life, and this dish is great for breakfast or for dinner. Cooking the eggs so the yolk is still runny provides a silky sauce for the earthy kale, and runny yolks contain lecithin, which helps counter the effects of cholesterol in the body. If you wish, you could add bits of prosciutto or mushrooms to the kale, or scatter the ramekins with some cheese a few minutes before they come out of the oven.

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Use this as is for a side dish, or cook some pasta such as orecchiette, cavatelli, or casarecce (or whatever) and use this as a sauce. Don’t forget to add 4-6 ounces of the pasta water to the dish to help form the sauce. It may seem odd to use salami here, but it is not uncommon in Italy, and the right salami can bring a lot of flavor to a dish. The Toscano called for here is typically flavorful and fairly easy to find.  For this dish, larger fat grains are good, and a fine deep flavor with some spice is good.

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This is a riff on a classic of Italian cuisine, only it has kale in it, because, y’know, it’s kale, and besides being good for you, it tastes good raw. As long as it is fairly tender and young. I find that crumpling kale leaves seems to result in a reaction that makes the leaves sweeter, so be vigorous while prepping the kale here. This is a salad that can be done quickly, especially if you are practiced at stripping the stems out of kale with your fingers, and your favas are already done or you skip them.

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Make this with wild rice, or if you have other leftover grains, you can use those. The flavor of wild rice goes perfectly with other ingredients.

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Modern American cuisine smacks into traditional Mediterranean. This salad was inspired by a Salade Niçoise, but is much, much simpler. You want to use good quality tuna for this-at least use albacore if you can’t find any European tuna packed in olive oil. Also, If you have beans you have cooked yourself the dish will be better for them, but the recipe simply calls for pantry staple canned white beans. Rinse them really well.

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Light supper, vegetable centric breakfast, call it what you will. This is a flavorful dish that is good for you, and it is easy if you are using peppers that were grilled the day before. For the eggs, it is best if the yolks are runny, as they make a “sauce” for the vegetables when you poke the yolk and it runs out over everything.

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This dish can be made with Scotch or Lacinato kale, but the more delicate Russian kale would not work as well. Use a good cooking apple that is firm and sweet with an edge of tartness.

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This salad uses two quickles (the carrots were a spin-off of the cauliflower) that, with a little study of the recipe, could be made all together, and you could reduce the volume of final product. Both the quickles are quite good, and last a long while in the refrigerator, so doing them both is a nice way to set yourself up for a couple weeks of crunchy sweet-tart vegetables that are easy to deploy. If lavender is not your thing, use the recipe for Cauliflower, Romanesco, and Carrot Quickles on site (which makes this simpler in that you do the carrots and cauliflower together, and the flavor is a more “traditional” pickle flavor), skipping the romanesco and celery and switching the dressing to a white wine vinaigrette with a very little rosemary in it along with some thyme and a hint of garlic.

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The smoky sweet bacon talks to both the sweetness of the carrots and the earthiness of the kale, enhancing both. If you have some King Oyster mushrooms, they would be an excellent addition.

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INGREDIENTS:

1 bunch Scotch kale, torn into bite-sized bits and washed and drained

1 medium white or brown onion, cut into medium dice

1-1½ cup olives* such as cerignola, Taggiasca, gordal, Niçoise, or other firm olive with flavor, pitted and cut into ¼-inch strips lengthwise

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A favorite breakfast of mine is sautéed greens served on thick toast with poached or fried eggs on top. The yolk coating the greens and the crisp chewy toast makes for a great combination. There is a myriad variations on this theme, but the eggs and greens are the baseline. This is often made with leftover greens or potatoes. If you are not a fan of poached eggs, you could skip the potatoes, or simply cut the potatoes into small enough cubes that they will cook through while you fry them. Although it looks like a long recipe, it goes quickly.

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From Chef Susan Pasko

This recipe is just one version of my master method for One-Pot Easy-Peasy Market Box Veggies.  The principles are always the same….  Start with onions and garlic cooked slowly in butter or oil.  Always give the onions a fifteen minute head start, (during which you can prep the other veg, or sit down with a cup of tea or glass of wine!)  Then add the hard vegetables, cook 15 minutes more, then the quick-cooking vegetables for 10 minutes, then the leaves which will wilt pretty quickly in most cases.  Adjust cooking times by tasting the veggies along the way….  These kind of recipes are guidelines, not rules.

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This soup is a riff on borscht, with kale filling in for the cabbage, and the vinegar on the roast beets filling in for the things that are often pickled in borscht. Some borscht uses sauerkraut, some have chopped pickles, some use a soured broth or kvass as the base. Although written as a hot soup, it could easily be chilled and served cold with yogurt or labne.

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The sharpness and funk that radishes sometimes have is mitigated by gentle cooking. Here, the radishes act as a foil to the earthiness of the kale and the radish tops, and the colors are nice on the plate as well.

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This dish is cooked so it is not soupy, but rather until there is just a bit of liquid left. You can add more vegetables as you wish, and mushrooms and/or sausages turns it into a full dinner for the carnivorous set. I like it next morning heated up with a couple of farm-fresh eggs poached or basted on top.

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This is one of those really simple dishes that surprises with how much flavor it packs. The kale acts as a foil with its earthy flavor to the fennels sweet, but it has a sweetness of its own that adds depth to the dish. Adding fennel seed and pastis adds even more dimension. Cooking the kale a shorter time gives it a toothsome quality that is a welcome texture with the fennel. Crushing the fennel with your hands seems to make it sweeter and also tenderizes it.

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Here is a twist on a favorite, the “Golden Beets and Kale Salad with Orange Cilantro Vinaigrette”. Here we see Orange Hokkaido fill in for golden beets, and some orange flavored cranberries are added for interest, and the dressing is changed up a little to back off the cilantro a bit, and an Orange Shiso dressing is offered as well, for those that have easy access to shiso.

For tips on peeling and cutting winter squash, see the article “Winter Squash” on the website.

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This slaw can be made with green cabbage, but if you have Savoy cabbage it is even better. This recipe includes strips of collard greens, but you can use lacinato, or other, kale if you wish, or skip it altogether.

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This is a variation on a theme for soup we call “Monday Soup”, which is a hearty vegetable soup, usually with sausage added, that can be eaten for 2-3 days after for lunches or whenever. This one uses a fair amount of fennel, and so will be a little sweet, which is countered by the greens and with vinegar added at the end.

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This is a dish with lots of flavor, and while filling, it will not weigh you down. The apple adds an unexpected lightness and sweetness that plays well with the squash and makes an excellent foil for the earthiness of the other ingredients. Feel free to leave it out if it seems discordant to you. This basic recipe is a good starting point for playing with your food. Try different types of squash. Experiment with whatever leftover grains you might have. Switch the greens around as well as the mushrooms.

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The Creamed Lacinato with Marsala can be used as a side dish or used to top crostini for appetizers. With a couple changes it works as a stuffing for ravioli or a squash gratin.

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This dish was inspired by a recipe from Maria Helms Sinskey. Use this as a side, on toasts as a starter, or to stuff Portobello mushrooms for a light supper.

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Lacinato, also called cavolo nero (black cabbage), is a kale that benefits from long cooking. Its deep flavor and sturdy texture blend well with the chewy quality and sweet flavor of farro. This dish can be cooked with extra liquid to make a soupy dish, or cooked until dry as here. You could put the finished dish into an oiled gratin dish and crack eggs into it and bake it with cheese for a light entrée, or toss in sausage for a one pot meal.

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You can do this without grilling the apricots, but the grilling just gives a little something “more”. This is the sort of recipe that happens when you have a LOT of apricots around.

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