Currently viewing the tag: "mint"

A variation on classic gremolata, tweaked a little to match up with romanesco or cauliflower fried until crisp.

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Quite easy, with big flavor. The sweetness of the tomatoes and mint, and the clean aromatic “whiffiness” are a great foil to the earthy kale. This dish would be fine with other kales as well as collards cut into ¼ inch ribbons.

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The smaller size of the ingredients of this salad give it a lightness and ensures you can get all the flavors in one bite, giving a sum that is more than the parts alone. Make this with or without the lettuce as you choose. It adds a welcome crunch, and slightly bitter and sweet flavor of the lettuce acts as a bridge between the zucchini and tomatoes.

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No meat in this, but the presentation, the thin slices, and the fact that it is raw make the connection in my mind. This is one of those times you want a fixed blade slicer. It can be done with a knife, but it will be a challenge. Cousa and zucchini are ideal for this dish, and Pattypan will work as well, but I think crooknecks are best left for other preparations. This dish lends itself to variations, from really simple to simple but elegant. The dressing can be scattered as separate ingredients or made into a vinaigrette, the garnish can be skipped or be complex-it’s all up to what you want at the time.

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A paean to late lasting summer bounty. Although the salad is like a lot of the Moroccan inspired ones posted before, this could be combined with lettuce if you wanted. It could also be piled onto toasted flat breads or grilled slabs of some crusty sturdy bread like a ciabatta or the like.

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Very simple, but lots of flavor. Watching the broccoli blanch so it does not overcook, and cutting it to the right size, is key here. Don’t overdo the mint or it will overwhelm the dish. Use just enough to taste as an accent. Also, try to use as little oil as you can get away with for this dish as it helps the broccoli to stay firm and bright.

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Although this is submitted for a dish of turnips and their tops, this goes with many things. Try it with lamp or beef, or beef, thick fish such as sword or tuna, smeared in sandwiches, or with eggs. For starts.

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INGREDIENTS:

1 Meyer lemon, zested with a Microplane or multi-channel zester*

¼ cup flat leaf parsley

½ cup mint leaves

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This is a simple dish with nowhere to hide for inferior ingredients, so make this with ripe flavorful tomatoes and fresh aromatic herbs. As it says, this is a great topping for fish, whether grilled, roasted, or poached. Use it with any thicker fish. Use a milder olive oil, and only enough to be noticed. Too strong and it will overpower the tomatoes, and too much will muffle all the flavors and make the salad/topping heavy.

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This recipe calls for new potatoes, but you can use anything really, as long as it is a waxy type. The new potatoes have a sweetness and nutty quality that just really plays well with this iteration of pesto. If the potatoes are smaller- 1-inch or less- smashing them with a fork or cutting board is great. If they are bigger, slicing is a good way to go, or cut the potato into 1-inch chunks and go from there. This helps to keep a good potato to pesto ratio for good flavor. If you decide to salt the finish dish, be sure to use a large crunchy type and go light with it. This is one of those simple dishes where it is all about the ingredients, and how some things just seem to go so well together.

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Here is another iteration of mint pesto. This uses traditional pine nuts, but you could substitute roasted almonds or combine the two. If you do not have fresh marjoram, skip it, but it adds depth to the mint and brightens it up. I prefer to use a mortar and pestle for my pesto, both for flavor/texture, and because it is hard to do smaller batches in a food processor. Both methods are given, but I hope you will try the mortar and pestle method.

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Roasting the tomatoes concentrates the tomato sweetness, while also adding a haunting roasted background note. The basil oil is a great finish, and you could use Thai basil for the oil which would be great also. If you don’t have that handy, the mint crema (yogurt and mint) will work fine. You could also drizzle with some balsamic vinegar, especially if you have some of the thick aged stuff stashed.

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This dressing was concocted for Grilled Strawberries and Little Gem Salad, but would work well with grilled shrimp, lamb meatballs, or falafel. It would go nicely with Herbed Chicken Paillards in a sandwich as well.

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This a colorful and aromatic dish that has plenty of crunch due to just cooking the vegetables lightly and quickly. The recipe lists shiso, which is a Japanese herb that usually shows up in sushi. If you do not have it, don’t worry, carry on without it. I used as it was in the garden, and it adds depth to the dish, but you won’t miss it if it is not there. Leftovers make a good cold salad as is, or you could lightly dress it with a little white balsamic vinaigrette.

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This salad could be a starter salad, or would be good as part of a lunch on a warm day with grilled chicken. At dinner, this would be a great way to bridge a salad and dessert course, or could come before the cheese in lieu of dessert. This is a very simple recipe, but that is so the flavors of each ingredient shines through. It may seem odd to use lettuce, but the faintly bitter and mineral-y flavor and the gentle crunch of the butter lettuce is a great foil to the sweetness and texture of the berries. If you wanted to add something to the salad, some chopped roasted almonds, pistachios, or hazelnuts would work with the sweet nutty flavor adding a bottom note to the ensemble.

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This dressing is a variation on another which contains mustard and uses a different sweetener. This iteration is for a salad of blueberries and strawberries and tender red butter leaf lettuce.

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The “dressing” is fairly chunky, and could be considered a condiment as well. This salad makes a nice side to grilled fish or chicken, or you can omit the lettuce and use the dressed radishes as a topping for something.

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Although this salad is known to many as Israeli salad, it seems it is more commonly called Arab salad in Israel. No matter what it is called, a variant of this exists in most places throughout the Middle East, and in Israel- a country of immigrants-there are hundreds of versions all based on family heritage or personal preference.

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This is a quick and simple dish that is all about the balance between the spiciness, the basil flavor, and the background of sweetness and umami notes. You can make it more or less spicy by changing the number of chilis, but there should always be a balance of flavor. There are many versions of this dish; this one is a distillation of time spent working in a Thai restaurant and many recipes. With or without the optional ingredients, the dish is still good. The optional kecap manis add depth of flavor and authenticity.

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For this salad, you want to use a softer lettuce such as a butter lettuce or green or red leaf. It works better with the blueberries, as something crunchier, like romaine, might overwhelm the berries texture and flavor. The dressing uses basil as the herb, but you could try mint instead. A little arugula would work well, but go lightly or the sharpness could drown out the other ingredients.

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This is a fast and loose interpretation of a Thai “yellow curry”. Be sure not to cook the vegetables to long or they will get mushy and unpleasant. This dish has some heat to it as written, but if you prefer it mild, simply omit the chilis. If you do not have Thai basil, substitute cilantro or mint. If you like your food spicy, substitute in 1/2 cup of Cilantro Chili Sauté Juice for a half cup of the stock.

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Another “cool” and fragrant dressing. Try it with a salad of romaine and blanched turnips. It also goes with grilled fish and shrimp, and would be a good dip for grilled chicken or lamb kebabs. It is also an excellent accompaniment to summer squash, whether raw or cooked.

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This technique works with other syrups as well, such as mint, ginger, or lavender.

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This is a mash of fava beans studded with small bits of summer squash flash sautéed to crisp them up a bit. This dish could serve as a topping for crostini or something from the grill. Here it is served in small Romaine leaves as a mezze. This dish has flavorings more from the Middle East, but switching the cilantro for mint or basil, and removing the cumin will swing it towards Italy, France, and Spain.

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This dressing was designed for the Radish Meyer Lemon Salad, but would go well with many other things. Perfect with shrimp or grilled swordfish, or grilled chicken or asparagus. Nice on fava beans too. If you want to keep this dressing for more than a couple days, strain it through a fine mesh strainer to remove the mint shreds which will discolor and start to taste swampy after a couple days.

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Although this is a topping for fish, it is good as a side salad as well. Add it to arugula or romaine for a nice salad. This dish is best made using a fixed blade slicer such as a Ben-Riner.

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This is a great salsa to make when you have firm and flavorful tomatoes. Feel free to use other colored tomatoes if you have them.

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Another iteration of one of my favorite uses for herbs.

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Fresh and cool tasting, this dressing is good on salads of course, but it goes quite well with grilled fish and shrimp, and with grilled chicken or lamb kebabs. It is also an excellent accompaniment to summer squash, whether raw or cooked.

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I love mint, so this was a natural progression. I think pistachios are better than pinenuts with mint, and almonds work well also. You could use either one, but I like the mixture. I prefer to use a mortar and pestle for my pesto, both for flavor/texture, and because it is hard to do smaller batches in a food processor. Both methods are given , but I hope you will try the mortar and pestle method. 

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