Currently viewing the tag: "mushrooms"

Mayonnaise is used for simplicity, as well as for its wonderful ability to brown up and form a nice glaze. If you wish for something lower calorie and lower cholesterol, you can use whipped egg whites instead, although it may not brown nearly as well. You could whip the whites and fold in the whisked yolk if you want loft and richness as well. If you do not have green garlic, just use a single clove of garlic minced or just season the pan by cooking the whole clove in the oil you’ll cook the spinach in. Don’t have oyster mushrooms? Don’t worry about it. Cook ¼ of a finely diced white or yellow onion and cook it until soft before adding spinach. Although the recipe looks long, it is really not. There are just lots of tips to ensure this is an easy dish.

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A bit of a fusion combing some Western technique and Japanese, and pretty much all traditional Japanese flavors.

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Quick and easy, the sauce is actually made with starchy pasta water and a little butter, the way they do it in Italian restaurants when not using cream, or tomatoes. See bottom for variations using meats/chili flakes/nuts.

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The meaty, winey Portobello mushroom and the nutty starchy farro mellow the bitter and earthy flavor of the radicchio while the sweetness of the carrot and onion dice act as a counterpoint. This is a dish with some substance, and the mushrooms make a good substitute for meat texturally and flavor-wise.

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A typically savory grain dish with a sweet surprise-bits of lightly sautéed apple to counter the earthiness of the chard and mushrooms. This is classically Italian in heritage, where raisins or currants are used to offset bitter greens.

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Serve this as a side or over pappardelle noodles or with crisp sautéed gnocchi. This could also be served over slices of sturdy grilled bread as bruschetta. Also, it is good hot or room temperature.

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The smoky sweet bacon talks to both the sweetness of the carrots and the earthiness of the kale, enhancing both. If you have some King Oyster mushrooms, they would be an excellent addition.

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This soup is a riff on borscht, with kale filling in for the cabbage, and the vinegar on the roast beets filling in for the things that are often pickled in borscht. Some borscht uses sauerkraut, some have chopped pickles, some use a soured broth or kvass as the base. Although written as a hot soup, it could easily be chilled and served cold with yogurt or labne.

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This could be considered a hearty miso soup, or a stew. To add more depth of flavor to the dish, make your dashi using “blond” vegetable stock (see recipe on site). They type of miso will also affect the flavor a lot, with white miso being lighter and sweeter in flavor, whereas red miso tends to be deeper flavored and saltier. For a flavorful contrast, you could quickle the stems from the turnip greens if they are thick and use them as a garnish. Adding dumplings of some sort will certainly make the dish more substantial, as would adding noodles.

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You could do this with the vegetarian dashi, but the smoky aroma and depth of flavor from the hana-katsuo really make this dish. Although it is not quite the same, and it will tint the dish red, you could use smoked paprika if you wish to go vegetarian. Use this dish as a base for seared fish or roasted King Oyster mushrooms. You could also use this as a base for noodles/pasta.

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Since the main components of this dish are large, this is a knife and fork dish. It can serve as a base for something larger like fish, or you can use it as a side. Add some slices of pork and some noodles and it can be a one-pot full meal.

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Use these as a side or appetizer, or use Portobello mushrooms in lieu of the button mushrooms for a first course or main. This recipe calls for scallions because they are in the box this week, but if you don’t have them to hand, use white or yellow onions, or even shallots. These can be assembled ahead of time, with the exception of the bread crumb topping which should be added only at the last moment or it will be soggy. When choosing mushrooms, look for those that are still fairly closed and the gills have not darkened yet. Dark gills on button mushrooms are a sign of age, and they are bitter when cooked. If you have your heart set on this dish and the mushrooms all have dark gills, scrape out the gills with a spoon before beginning.

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Minestrone is part of the “Cucina Povera” school of Italian cooking. “Povera” and poverty share roots, so this is a soup that is usually made of what is on hand, and recipes vary widely. Here is one based on my college days.

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This is pretty quick to make, and the flavors combine to make a dish with flavors ranging from deep umami to bright top notes from the OJ, with just about everything in between. Fire up some rice in the rice cooker and you have an easy dinner.

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For this recipe you will need ramekins or small soufflé dishes. The recipe calls for four 10 to 12 ounce ramekins, but you can use 8 ounce/1 cup ramekins as well. These are great “make ahead” dishes and can be stored in the freezer. Using left-over farro or other grain makes this dish easier. If you have more than enough stuffing, make extra packets and freeze them or use the stuffing in a frittata or as a sauté. Although this recipe looks long, it is not complex and really does not take too long to do.

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From Chef Colin Moody

Yield: approx 1.5 cups

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From Chef Colin Moody

Serves 4

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Part of the appeal of this dish is the gentle seasoning so the flavors of the ingredients stand on their own. Blanching the garlic mitigates the heat, but leaves behind the wonderful garlic flavor. If you have green garlic, that would be great in lieu of the garlic. Simply cut it into ribbons as wide as the leeks and cook it the same. For the stock, you want a very light vegetable stock, preferably homemade.

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If your turnips come with the greens on, remove the stems and wash the leaves, tear into bite-sized pieces, then add to the pan to wilt just before adding the dressing, or cook the greens separately and put on the plate first, the add the turnips and mushrooms, then dress.

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This is a nice and light dish with bright flavors. If you have green garlic, be sure to use some of that in the filling. Button mushrooms will work fine in lieu of oyster mushrooms, but avoid shiitake as they will take over the dish.

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Definitely a fusion dish drawing on India and Southeast Asia for inspiration, with some pure California thrown in as well.

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This light soup celebrates spring. If you have asparagus, add some 1/8th inch bias cut slices and you have all the local vegetable harbingers of the season. This recipe is more of a guideline, really. Feel free to play with it. You could just add the chard stems to the liquid, but the sautéing brings out sweetness in the stems, and wilting the chard in a separate pan gives a lighter, cleaner flavor to the broth. The fava greens are the tips of the plants, including some of the flowers.  Add mushrooms, carrot shreds, whatever you find.

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This recipe uses a store bought roast chicken, but feel free to use leftover chicken if you have it. If you wish, substitute soba or udon for the ramen, as each noodle type has something to offer to this dish. A Ben-Riner or other fixed blade slicer makes this dish a lot easier to prep. Thin slices help keep cooking time down.

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This is a satisfying main course salad with plenty of crunch and lots of umami flavor, thanks to the roasted mushrooms and the roasted chicken. This recipe is based around the roasted chickens you find at the store or any leftover chicken you have on hand. Using a Ben-Riner or other fixed blade slicer makes the prep for this salad fly. You could even slice the vegetables the day before and bag or box them until needed. Tearing the mushrooms with your hands is quick and leaves lots of edges to crisp up and add texture to the dish.

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This is a variation on a theme for soup we call “Monday Soup”, which is a hearty vegetable soup, usually with sausage added, that can be eaten for 2-3 days after for lunches or whenever. This one uses a fair amount of fennel, and so will be a little sweet, which is countered by the greens and with vinegar added at the end.

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This recipe involves cooking tomatoes, onions, and garlic down to a jam-like consistency and tossing blanched broccoli in the sauce to coat. The recipe may make more than you need for the broccoli, and if that is the case, just freeze the remainder and use it on pasta, other vegetables or use it coat roasted chicken, fish, or shrimp.

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This is a dish with lots of flavor, and while filling, it will not weigh you down. The apple adds an unexpected lightness and sweetness that plays well with the squash and makes an excellent foil for the earthiness of the other ingredients. Feel free to leave it out if it seems discordant to you. This basic recipe is a good starting point for playing with your food. Try different types of squash. Experiment with whatever leftover grains you might have. Switch the greens around as well as the mushrooms.

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This salad uses a dressing of Date Molasses, which is a thick syrup made of dates that has a tangy sweetness to it. The kabocha croutons can be made ahead. Be sure to use the green kabocha as it is drier than the orange.

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The Creamed Lacinato with Marsala can be used as a side dish or used to top crostini for appetizers. With a couple changes it works as a stuffing for ravioli or a squash gratin.

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This dish was inspired by a recipe from Maria Helms Sinskey. Use this as a side, on toasts as a starter, or to stuff Portobello mushrooms for a light supper.

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