Currently viewing the tag: "pork"

This recipe was made to go with Crisp Pan Roasted Salmon, but will go with roast chicken as well as seared scallops, black cod, or pork chops. Leeks cook to a silky texture similar to escarole, and the earthy funk combines well with the slightly bitter escarole. Although the recipe calls for white wine or sherry vinegar, a white balsamic or a good quality red wine vinegar would go great here as well. If you do go with red wine vinegar, serve a red wine that has plenty of fruit, but also some tannins to match the vinegar and act as a foil to the rich salmon and the smoothness of the vegetables. You could also toss this with pasta or grains such as farro.

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Here is a dish that is perfect for Holiday tables or at home dinners, and is, in fact, a riff on the classic green bean casserole with fried onions. No cream of mushroom soup or sauce. The leeks and pancetta or bacon can be cooked a couple days prior and they will hold in the refrigerator. Be sure to keep the fat from the pancetta or bacon as the flavor is integral to the dish.

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The smoky sweet bacon talks to both the sweetness of the carrots and the earthiness of the kale, enhancing both. If you have some King Oyster mushrooms, they would be an excellent addition.

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Since the main components of this dish are large, this is a knife and fork dish. It can serve as a base for something larger like fish, or you can use it as a side. Add some slices of pork and some noodles and it can be a one-pot full meal.

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For what it’s worth, gratin refers to the cooking vessel and the way it is used, not just the dish itself. Anything can be cooked “au gratin” and the recipe itself is varied. Potatoes alone, or mixed with other roots such as parsnip, turnip, or onion. Mushrooms, kale, artichoke hearts, olives, all these can go in as well. The dish can be made with or without cheese, with cream, milk, stock, or any combination of these. In summer, I make gratins with vegetables that are “wet” (tomatoes, eggplant, etc.) and the only liquid I use is a little bit of flavorful olive oil. In colder months I make traditional creamy, cheesy gratins with roots and tubers. You can be precise in the way you lay in the ingredients or you can be casual. Bear in mind that the thickness of the cuts, the density of the vegetables, and how tightly packed in the dish everything is can affect the cooking times. This recipe is a variation of a quiche I used to make, and it is named for Denise who likes it so much I can never make enough.

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Slowly braising Romano beans renders them meltingly tender, but they retain their shape and pick up a sweet and nutty quality. The other vegetables in the dish become silky and the chard adds depth and earthiness. Bacon always goes well with beans and greens, but if you prefer not to use it, substitute some sweet smoked paprika.

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This is pretty quick to make, and the flavors combine to make a dish with flavors ranging from deep umami to bright top notes from the OJ, with just about everything in between. Fire up some rice in the rice cooker and you have an easy dinner.

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From Chef Colin Moody

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Although you can buy things called balsamic reductions, or balsamic condiment or glaze, all over the place now, a good many of them are made with inferior, or downright lousy, balsamic vinegar, or not even true balsamic vinegar. A lot of them have caramel, sugar, or other things added to them. Some of these things are for flavoring, others are to thicken.

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This dressing is for a shaved fennel salad, but the fennel would make this a nice dressing to top grilled fish or pork chops. You could make the fennel salad without the lettuce and use this dressing with it for topping the aforementioned.

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If you don’t have leeks, just substitute 2 onions, yellow or red, halved and sliced into half-moons.

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Although this dish originally was made to stuff chicken, it is quite good on it’s own as a side dish. The goat cheese is a nice option, but the dish is fine without it. Pine nuts work well in lieu of pistachios. This stuffing works great in whole chickens, chicken breasts, pork chops, fish, or even big pasta shells.

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This is for the Romaine, Roasted Beets, and Apricot salad, but would be a nice sauce for grilled chicken with grilled apricots, or pork chops. It would also be nice with a salad of butter leaf lettuces with apricots and a small round of fresh goat cheese rolled in bread crumbs and baked until golden served with toasts.

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This is my take on the famous New Mexican Green sauce. If you find Hatch chilies, snap them up to use for this recipe. In the meantime, use New Mexico chiles, and if you can’t find those, use Anaheim peppers. The poblano peppers give the sauce a mild heat.

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This dressing goes with many salads, but works quite well with salads that include blueberries. It also would be a good sauce for grilled pork or chicken.

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This is meant to be eaten as a salad course, but with a little tweaking of the ingredients it would make a nice topping for flattened out and grilled pork chops or chicken breast.

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This dressing is meant to go with Salad of Romaine Hearts with Cherry Tomatoes and Scallions. This dressing would be good as a sauce for pork chops or grilled halibut as well.

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As it says, this stock is perfect for braising Chinese greens such as mei quin and other choys. It makes a great base for noodle soups with vegetables, and shiitake mushrooms pair with this quite well. This recipe makes 1 quart, which is more than most dishes call for, but this freezes well and is great for turning leftovers and a packet of quick ramen into something really good without using those little flavor packets full of who knows what. You can freeze this in ice-cube trays and pull out what you need as you go. Use a couple cubes as a base with water for quick soups.

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Frequently, when a chef hears “greens”, the next thing they think is “Get some bacon, ham, or other pork…” They just go together like peanut butter and jelly. This stock is for those occasions. It carries the pork flavor without taking up time to cook the bacon or ham first, and is a lighter flavor and there is little fat to deal with. This is a “basic” version infused with the sweet smoky flavor of ham.  (See Ham Stock 2 for a Chinese/Asian boost to make it ideal for things like braising mei quin or using in noodle dishes and soups.) This recipe makes 1 quart, which is more than most dishes call for, but this freezes well.

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This is a simple recipe that requires using Ham Stock Number 2 (see recipe). It is a nice dish to accompany things, especially ham steak cooked in orange juice and hoisin with shiitakes. There is no ham in the dish, other than what was used to infuse the stock.

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Here is my take on the bistro classic of frisee salad scattered with lardons (thick batons of crispy chewy bacon) and topped with a poached egg. There are not a lot of components to this dish, so use the freshest eggs and good quality thick cut or slab bacon. Note that this recipe serves two rather than the usual 4 due to the fact that unless there are two heads of frisee per box, or they are really large heads, that is how much the average frisee will serve.

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A classic dressing for Frisee au Lardons (Curly Endive with Bacon and Poached Egg), a bistro classic. Here the dressing is lightened up a bit using more oil than bacon fat. This dressing is also good on spinach, especially if warmed up a little bit.

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If the idea of ham does not appeal, use some Pimenton de la Vera instead for the broth. The smoky flavor really pulls this dish together. Use more stock to turn this into a brothy soup, or cook it down until the stock has reduced to a glaze and serve as a side. Finishing with a few drops of a vinegar based hot-sauce, vinegar, or lemon juice adds a bright spark to the dish and emphasizes the sweetness in the ham, leeks, and peas.

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Great for cold weather. This makes a fair amount, but is great as leftovers for lunch the next day, or even breakfast with a fried egg on top. If you like the idea of smoky, but not the ham hock, you can skip it and use some Pimenton de la Vera (Smoked Spanish paprika) to add the smokiness.

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This recipe is for a salad that is used as a topping for breaded chops. The contrast between the hot crisp chop and the cool salad with its peppery bite and slight acid from tomatoes and vinaigrette makes for a wonderful dish. This salad is also excellent on its own, or as a topping for bruschetta.

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Arugula Prosciutto Salad Rolls are simply slices of prosciutto wrapped around a bit of lightly dressed arugula salad – an easy and tempting appetizer.

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Perfect for a cold winter night

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One day I read about how some Southern cook did her beans, and had to try it. I was so happy I did. This method produces meltingly tender beans that are sweet and have a full bean flavor, but the beans hold their shape. Just remember, patience is a virtue! Don’t keep checking the pot, stirring it, or otherwise messing with it. And you can’t hurry it. But it really is worth the wait.

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INGREDIENTS:

4 pork loin chops cut thick, around 4-6 oz. each
½ pound of apples such as Granny Smith, Cameo, or Golden Delicious (1 Large or 2 medium), cut into ¼ inch thick slices or ½” cubes
1 medium shallot, minced
1 oz. high quality apple brandy such as Osocalis*, or a French Calvados. Cognac or brandy may be used as well.
4 oz apple cider or juice
½ tsp fresh minced rosemary

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This is the basic method for sautéing mustard greens. You can add to it as you will. Blanch, then sauté in aromatics flavored with some sort of fat (I tend to go with bacon, ham, or prosciutto because I love the flavor, but good olive oil works fine as a base.) Finish with a dash of acid and serve. For the acid, I vary it based on what the dish is being served with. White wine, cider, red wine, or white balsamic vinegars, or lemon juice, all can come into play-just think of what the dish will be served with to aid your choice.

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