Currently viewing the tag: "potatoes"

Be sure to use a thin bacon, or the gratin might fall apart when you cut it. Use a Ben-Riner or mandolin

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The escarole melts into the onions and adds a nice mildly bitter foil to the sweetness of the onions and the yellow fleshed potatoes. You could use cream in lieu of the stock for richer gratin. To make an all-in-one dish, add ham or bacon.

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The flavors of potato and artichoke go so well together, and the textures are similar as well, so there is a flavorful surprise possible with each bite. Crisping the outsides gives a wonderful contrast to the interior creaminess, and the mild spring garlic adds a gentle garlicky note without any of the heat bulbed garlic can. If you don’t have spring garlic, spring onions, scallions, or no alliums will work also.

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Pistou is the French equivalent of pesto, but has no nuts or cheese. The cheese is added either to the soup or scattered over the soup at the end. This soup is only inspired and is not a true pistou, just in case any Provençal are reading this.

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This has v.2 appended to it because when I came up with this I wrestled with the idea of cooking the tomatoes first as a base for the potatoes and collards, like this, or where the greens and spuds are cooked, and then dressed with a cold dressing of tomatoes, garlic, onions, and oil and vinegar. In the end, I did both as I am always fascinated how the same ingredients can be put together in different ways to yield “the same but different” results.

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This has v.1 appended to it because when I came up with this I wrestled with the idea of cooking the tomatoes first as a base for the potatoes and collards, or doing it like this, where the greens and spuds are cooked, and then dressed with a cold dressing of tomatoes, garlic, onions, and oil and vinegar. In the end, I did both as I am always fascinated how the same ingredients can be put together in different ways to yield “the same but different” results.

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Here, Patatas Bravas are the inspiration. You could use this dish like a tapa and serve smaller amounts of it, or use it as a side dish. Serve hot, warm, or room temperature.

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A favorite breakfast of mine is sautéed greens served on thick toast with poached or fried eggs on top. The yolk coating the greens and the crisp chewy toast makes for a great combination. There is a myriad variations on this theme, but the eggs and greens are the baseline. This is often made with leftover greens or potatoes. If you are not a fan of poached eggs, you could skip the potatoes, or simply cut the potatoes into small enough cubes that they will cook through while you fry them. Although it looks like a long recipe, it goes quickly.

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This was a dish that occurred from a Tour du Fridge one year. I have done this using large artichokes as well as small ones. For the large ones, I trimmed everything away from the heart (saving the leaves and steaming them until done, and then eat them as you would from a whole artichoke) and cut it into cubes. For small artichokes I just followed the basic prep as in the recipe for Braised Baby Artichokes on the site right up to the cutting them into sixths. Either way works for this recipe. The potatoes and artichokes are a wonderful combination of flavors.

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A flavorful soup with a creamy texture (no dairy here, though) punctuated with ribbons of chard for color and textural interest. The creamy texture comes from using a potato. This is an easy to make soup.

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I love gratins. I like to experiment with various ingredients and see how well they go together. Knowing that celeriac and potatoes go well as a mash, I was pretty sure this would work well also. It sure does. This light version of a gratin does not use cream or cheese.

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A light and satisfying dish that goes well with lighter flavored proteins, or pairs well with beans and light grains such as rice or quinoa.

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These are the potatoes that brought Chef Joel Robuchon to world notice, and they are the potatoes that brought Jean Pierre Clot fortune. He is the man who resurrected this potato from the Alps and sent it to Chef Robuchon, who proceeded to make this over-the-top version of mashed potatoes. This version is simplified from Chef Robuchon’s, as it skips using a tamis, or drum sieve, for the potatoes. Do not attempt this in a food processor or blender as it will provide you with gummy, pasty potatoes. You will need a food mill, or a ricer.

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This dish is sweet, nutty, and “green”, with a sweet and funky base from leeks, garlic, and sage, and then is topped with a bread crumb Persillade. Both light and satisfying, if you add some cooked shelling beans and grains like barley or farro you have robust vegetable dish that can stand alone.

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This is dish with some substance that is still brightly flavored and not heavy. Depending on how much you reduce the cooking liquid, it can be soupy, a little saucy, or dry. Use it as a base to a protein, or a main course. Add some grains and a little yogurt or cheese and you have a complete protein. Using different herbs or spices will change the flavor profile, so have fun seasoning the dish.

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For what it’s worth, gratin refers to the cooking vessel and the way it is used, not just the dish itself. Anything can be cooked “au gratin” and the recipe itself is varied. Potatoes alone, or mixed with other roots such as parsnip, turnip, or onion. Mushrooms, kale, artichoke hearts, olives, all these can go in as well. The dish can be made with or without cheese, with cream, milk, stock, or any combination of these. In summer, I make gratins with vegetables that are “wet” (tomatoes, eggplant, etc.) and the only liquid I use is a little bit of flavorful olive oil. In colder months I make traditional creamy, cheesy gratins with roots and tubers. You can be precise in the way you lay in the ingredients or you can be casual. Bear in mind that the thickness of the cuts, the density of the vegetables, and how tightly packed in the dish everything is can affect the cooking times. This recipe is a variation of a quiche I used to make, and it is named for Denise who likes it so much I can never make enough.

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This recipe calls for new potatoes, but you can use anything really, as long as it is a waxy type. The new potatoes have a sweetness and nutty quality that just really plays well with this iteration of pesto. If the potatoes are smaller- 1-inch or less- smashing them with a fork or cutting board is great. If they are bigger, slicing is a good way to go, or cut the potato into 1-inch chunks and go from there. This helps to keep a good potato to pesto ratio for good flavor. If you decide to salt the finish dish, be sure to use a large crunchy type and go light with it. This is one of those simple dishes where it is all about the ingredients, and how some things just seem to go so well together.

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This dish was somehow inspired by the classic tapa known as Tortilla Española. Don’t ask how, as I am not sure myself. The potatoes used are important here. Find something like a Yellow Finn or Yukon Gold, or other potato that possesses a slightly sweet and nutty flavor without being a really waxy type, nor really mealy. Potato size also matters. The idea is the potato and sauce work together to highlight each other’s flavor, while the tomato acts as a counterpoint with acid and fruit, and the parsley adds earthy and vegetal notes.

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This sauce is part of a steamed potatoes and tomato dish that was inspired by a Tortilla Española, but is can be used with other things as well. Try it with garbanzo beans, grilled shrimp, or as a dip for flatbreads and crudités. It would be good under poached eggs as well. By the way, this is the perfect way to use the core of the cauliflower.

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This recipe contrasts the slightly bitter silkiness of escarole with the nutty sweetness of potatoes that have been sautéed crisp, with onions forming a bridge. This dish makes a nice side with sausages, ham steaks, and other sweet and rich meats.

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Serve this in bowls with slices of cheese toast. Add leftover chicken or grains such as farro or barley, or Israeli couscous.

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Ginger gives the stew a nice warm savor, and if you choose a spicy garam masala (curry powder) the potatoes will help mitigate the heat. Serve with a mint raita and cardamom scented basmati rice.

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Patatas Bravas are a classic in tapas bars. And like so many “classics” of cuisine, there are several versions of the “true” classic. Some use the tomato sauce, some don’t. They use a garlicky sauce like mayonnaise or aioli, sometimes called “allioli”, which is egg based.

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The apple in this brings out the sweetness of the cauliflower, and the potato adds body and echoes the nutty flavors of cauliflower. The Apple Balsamic vinegar can be found in gourmet shops and better grocery stores. It is a syrupy vinegar made as Balsamic vinegar is made, but uses apple juice as a starting point rather than grape.

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This could be eaten as a side dish, used to bed grilled steak or chicken, or serve on rafts of grilled toast as a tapa. As a tapa, have some olives, cubes of cheese, and chilled sherry, white wine, or beer handy. For this dish, use a milder Spanish for French style olive oil for best results.

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Food from the UK has some of the noisiest names, and can be so bland. Bangers and Mash. Bubble and Squeak. Colcannon. And Champ… Although simple, when made with good ingredients this dish is quite good. This is a classic Irish dish, also known as “poundies”, or bruitin in Gaelic.

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This is a flavorful mélange that is not wet enough to be a soup, but not dry, either. Although you could easily add more liquid for a soup or cook it dry as a side dish.

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This salad is a riff on a Salade Niçoise, with a Spanish bent.

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This is the classic Ligurian version of pasta with pesto from the area where pesto as we know it today was “invented”. Some recipes will tell you to cook the potatoes and beans in the water with the pasta, but that could over cook them, so here they are cooked until almost done and then the pasta is cooked separately. If you use fresh pasta, cook them together by all means.

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Although a substantial dish, the flavors are light.

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