Currently viewing the tag: "quickles"

You don’t really need anything else with this sandwich, except maybe some chips, and a beer or some iced tea. You have meat, a couple vegetables, starch, it’s all there. If you take the time to fry chicken, it is always good to make extras as it is the perfect leftover to start another meal with.

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Another recipe for the Quickles file. Romanesco lends itself beautifully to quickling-it maintains it crisp texture yet no longer tastes raw. This iteration was made for a Sicilian influenced salad, but it is easy enough to change your destination by changing your herbs and spices. Use these in the salad recipe or serve with plates of salami and charcuterie, burgers, or braises. Good with grilled salmon as well. If you just want these as a snack, see notes about adding lemon.

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These can be part of a salad, tossed into sandwiches, or just eaten as is. The white vinegar, dill, and dill seed/caraway are the Scandinavian influence.

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Modern American cuisine smacks into traditional Mediterranean. This salad was inspired by a Salade Niçoise, but is much, much simpler. You want to use good quality tuna for this-at least use albacore if you can’t find any European tuna packed in olive oil. Also, If you have beans you have cooked yourself the dish will be better for them, but the recipe simply calls for pantry staple canned white beans. Rinse them really well.

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Similar to a sunomono, but with thicker slices than is traditional, adding plenty of crunch. White wine vinegar makes for a more robust flavor as well.

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A variation on a standard Quickle, this uses a hot brine to soften up the carrots a little. These can be part of a salad, tossed into sandwiches, or just eaten as is.

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These are great straight out of the refrigerator, or make for a great salad, which is what they were first made for.

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This is a salad built on other components made earlier, such as quickles and grilled peppers. The cold crunchy vegetables and vinegar are perfect for appetites flagging in the heat.

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This salad uses two quickles (the carrots were a spin-off of the cauliflower) that, with a little study of the recipe, could be made all together, and you could reduce the volume of final product. Both the quickles are quite good, and last a long while in the refrigerator, so doing them both is a nice way to set yourself up for a couple weeks of crunchy sweet-tart vegetables that are easy to deploy. If lavender is not your thing, use the recipe for Cauliflower, Romanesco, and Carrot Quickles on site (which makes this simpler in that you do the carrots and cauliflower together, and the flavor is a more “traditional” pickle flavor), skipping the romanesco and celery and switching the dressing to a white wine vinaigrette with a very little rosemary in it along with some thyme and a hint of garlic.

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This recipe is a sort of faux turnip kimchee, and uses gochujang to bring deep flavor and heat to a simple quickle, which is great all on its own. Using the gochujang really transforms the dish in an almost Cinderella fashion. What is gochujang? You could almost call it the ketchup of Korea- a funky, sweet, salty, nutty paste of fermented soybeans (kind of like miso, but not…) and peppers. The heat can vary, but it will be there. Anything from mild to fairly spicy, it is pasty and thick, and is usually cut with something to thin it a little, and ginger and garlic are often added to up the umami already there. Try adding spoonsful to soups, stews, marinades, and rubs and see how great it is. Here, it simulates the flavor fermentation would bring to these quick pickles, and brings the heat.

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hamburgerI know it sounds strange, or over the top, but this actually works. Really well. It hits on many so levels, and the acid of the vegetables balance out the richness of the egg and meat. I first encountered this in Australia, then again recently in Seattle. This version is improved a little over the original-everything is cut so that less stuff falls into your lap. In Australia, anything with a fried egg thrown in is having with “the lot”.

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For this salad, a tender lettuce like Butter or Oakleaf is the perfect contrast to the dense beets and crunchy quickles. If you can’t find small red onions for your quickles, go with shallots instead. Although very simple, this salad is so satisfying with the range of textures and flavors. Also, the beets and quickles can be done days ahead, along with the dressing.

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Not truly pickled, these beans are what I call “quickles”. The recipe differs from most of my quickle recipes in that the quickling solution is a vinaigrette instead of the usual vinegar/sugar solution. This dish is great cold, but can be served hot as well.

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Not truly pickled, these beans are what I call “quickles”. These are great cold, but can be served heated as well.

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This can be a very quick salad if you already have the quickles on hand, but if you don’t, they do not take long to make, and are excellent on so many other things.

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The basic version of this would be to simply lay down a circle of beets, and then pile a mound of diced avocado in the center of the circle, and then dress it with the dressing of your choice. To make it fancy, use a ring mold to form the beet circle on the plate, and then a smaller one centered in the beets for the avocado. From there, this combination splinters into so many variations. Adding different lettuces changes the tone of the salad. Using cilantro takes it to the Southwest or to Mexico. Switch to arugula with almonds or pistachios for something different, but where the nuts and avocado complement each other. Utilizing shrimp will add another dimension as well. This recipe is just a door way to ideas. Step through.

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These quick pickled beets can be seasoned with whatever herbs or spices will suit your palate or recipe. For this recipe, the quickling solution is heated up and the beets lightly cook in it while absorbing the flavors. Use these in salads, sandwiches, and as a side to a main course.

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These are great straight out of the refrigerator, or make for a great salad, which is what they were first made for.

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This salad is a study in contrasts with the tender slightly bitter Butter lettuces and the silky nutty avocado up against the crunchy sweet-tart elements of the quickles. Using plenty of Italian parsley in the vinaigrette gives an earthy and green element to bring things together.

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This salad also features an oregano infused olive oil and calls for optional quickled red spring onions. The dressing has some fennel seed powder to echo the shaved fennel. You want to use a Ben Riner or other fixed blade slicer for this.

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These can be made in minutes and will keep around a week in the refrigerator. These are not a true pickle and will not store for long times nor should they be left unrefrigerated long periods.

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This is a riff on a sandwich I had in San Francisco at the De Young museum. If you make this during tomato season, by all means add a couple thin slices of tomato to the sandwich.

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Use these on sandwiches, roast or grilled meats, combined with sprouts to top things, or as here, as an element to a green salad.

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Pistachio oil is pricey, but is a wonderful indulgence. It works magic in dressings, lentils, and grains, and is a nice way to finish scallops or fish. It matches well with orange and other citrus. Look for smaller bottles and keep it in the refrigerator. If you do not have pistachio oil, just use a plain red wine vinaigrette.

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When prepping the mizuna, you will find scissors are great for stemming it.

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Another recipe from the Quickles file. Cauliflower lends itself beautifully to this technique-it maintains it crisp texture yet no longer tastes raw, and the blend of lavender, fennel seed, and peppercorns brings out the sweetness of the cauliflower. The lavender will tint white cauliflower, but if you use purple cauliflower the color is even nicer. These are nice to serve as an appetizer or as a side to accompany braise and stews, roasts, burgers, or as part of a salad. They go really well with a dish of lentils topped with a poached egg. It turns out kids like them as well, and they last for quite a while in the refrigerator.

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Serve this as a side dish, or use it to top pizza. It could be tossed with romaine lettuce for a salad or the leaves could be left whole and filled with, or use this to top bruschetta or crostini. If using for anything but pizza, try the Quickles option. The cool crunch and the bracing tartness of the vinegar is a wonderful foil to the plush textures and oil rich flavors of the pesto and peppers.

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Think German Potato salad with a South West bent. The Purplette Quickles stand in for regular pickles, and the cilantro dressing takes the recipe South West.

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This is a variation on the Quickle theme. The “pickling” solution is heated to infuse it with the flavors of the herbs and spices, and then is poured over the roasted beets so it is absorbed as the beets cool. Tarragon is a great flavor to go with beets, and the other spices are there to enhance this marriage.

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Although the recipe calls for red radishes, you could use others of a similar shape and size. Also, after a day, the radishes lose their red rims and the entire radish turns a pale magenta. They lose the hot edge of a radish, and will smell a little like sauerkraut, but will not taste as strong. These quickles are not a subtle flavor, but they go well with things like braised beef, corned beef sandwiches, and are great with smoked salmon and especially herring pickled in white wine.

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