Currently viewing the tag: "radishes"

This salad is all about the interplay of the ingredients-the various kinds of crunch against the silkiness of the avocado and the dressing. The nutty flavor of arugula and the bread crumbs and the bite of radish and arugula.

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This is a brightly flavored treatment for meaty swordfish. The radishes are a great foil for the buttery sauce and sweet tasting fish. Untoasted coriander seed has a citrusy profile that matches well with the sauce. If you wanted to, you could lightly cook the radishes in the sauce to give them a softer flavor, but the soaked raw slices provide a nice crunch as well as a little heat for contrast.

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Simple in make-up, but the flavors are refreshing and the contrasts of cold and warm and crisp and succulent make for an enjoyable salad. The dressing is made from the butter and oil used to roast the radishes, and are infused with fresh basil flavor.

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A variation on a theme, only here the butter and oil from roasting form part of a Meyer lemon dressing that garnishes the radishes and dresses the Little Gem lettuce salad this recipe is destined for. This recipe would be nice with fish, chicken or pork, or anything that would go with the word picatta.

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Good as an appetizer using diagonal slices of baguette, or use larger slices topped with the salad and a fried egg with a runny yolk or two for breakfast or a light lunch.

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The root of this dish would be a stir-fry with daikon and mei-quin, but the flavors are more European. This would qualify as a California “fusion” dish. This dish is quite simple, but the looks are elegant with the cool jade and pale reddish pink.

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Early crop strawberries have a tart edge while still being sweet. This creates an interplay with nutty spicy arugula, and the sharpness of the radish is first mitigated by a short ice-water bath, and then the sweetness of the berries.

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Similar to a sunomono, but with thicker slices than is traditional, adding plenty of crunch. White wine vinegar makes for a more robust flavor as well.

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Fattoush, often considered Lebanese in origin, is one of those ubiquitous salads found pretty much anywhere flatbread is eaten and tomatoes grow. Like the Italian salad called Panzanella it was probably a way to not waste bread after it had gone stale. Of many iterations, the two constants it seem to be flat bread and tomatoes. The greens vary from romaine to butter lettuce to arugula to none at all. Cucumber? Peppers? Radishes? Some use pomegranate seeds, some have pomegranate syrup in the dressing, while some have none. Like so many dressings of the Middle-East, this one is “slack”, meaning it is not a fully emulsified vinaigrette, so be sure to mix it up one more time just before pouring it on.

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This is another salad inspired by the contents of a taqueria. Using a mandolin or Ben-Riner is best for the carrot and radish slices.

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The sharpness and funk that radishes sometimes have is mitigated by gentle cooking. Here, the radishes act as a foil to the earthiness of the kale and the radish tops, and the colors are nice on the plate as well.

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The Salsa Verde for this recipe uses enough olive oil to make it a dressing. If you wish, you can use a creamy orange fennel dressing (See recipe) instead.

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This is a light refreshing salad with a peppery quality that could easily double as a topping or side for something like seared pork chops or duck breasts. You want to use pinky-thin sweet carrots for this, and they should be sliced really thinly-a mandolin would be ideal. The carrots are there to offer a sweet contrast to the other vegetables. If you don’t have skinny sweet carrots, skip them and use pine nuts or almonds instead.

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This salad is really simple. What makes it is the quality of the ingredients, and the interplay between them. Crisp and refreshing, this salad is nice as a contrast to foods off the grill. Although best done with a mandolin, a really sharp nice will work for the slicing as well.

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This is a nice little appetizer/hors d’oeuvre thing that is simple yet is full of flavor. They can be prepared well in advance, and then just popped into the oven when needed. The compound butter would be great packed under shrimp shells or around shrimp in a small roasting pan, and would combine well with the radishes. With a cold crisp white wine and a salad this would be a nice supper on a warm evening.

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The “dressing” is fairly chunky, and could be considered a condiment as well. This salad makes a nice side to grilled fish or chicken, or you can omit the lettuce and use the dressed radishes as a topping for something.

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I call these “Holiday” because the triangular shape of the cut quesadilla and the green and red of the guacamole and radish reminded me of Christmas trees with ornaments on, but these are good anytime. They do make good party food, though.

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Dill is a flavor that goes well with radishes. To make this salad easier, cook the filet beans the night before, using some for dinner and pulling some a little early for the salad.

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Potato salad with some extra crunch thrown in. Bintji potatoes are great for this salad, but other starchy spuds will work as well. If your carrots taper to a diameter of less than ¼ inch, cut off the tips and just use the top ends of the carrots, using the tips for another dish.

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This dressing is for a green salad with blueberries, almonds, and mozzarella, but would work well with other things as well. Use with cold shrimp or chicken, or a salad of sliced radishes and green onions, slaws, or with fennel, among other things.

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This dressing goes with the Potato, Radish, Celery, Carrot, and Kale Salad, but will of course work elsewhere. Creamy is in quotes because there is just enough cream used to give the dressing silkiness and loft. You could also use mayonnaise instead of cream for a similar effect. The honey used initially for this dressing was from Keith Kimes’ hives on the Lewis Road High Ground Organics farm. It is a light bodied grade “C” with a high moisture content, so it mixes into the dressing readily, and is not super sweet, but very aromatic. Perfect for dressings.

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There are many dishes where the greens of things such radishes, turnips, and carrots are combined with used as a sauce for the roots they are attached to. Here is a recipe that has a powerfully “green” flavor to it similar to that of nettles, and is colorful as well. Be sure to wash the leaves in several changes of water as they seem to hold sand and fine particles well.

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Although the recipe calls for red radishes, you could use others of a similar shape and size. Also, after a day, the radishes lose their red rims and the entire radish turns a pale magenta. They lose the hot edge of a radish, and will smell a little like sauerkraut, but will not taste as strong. These quickles are not a subtle flavor, but they go well with things like braised beef, corned beef sandwiches, and are great with smoked salmon and especially herring pickled in white wine.

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If you want a twist on bagel with lox, try this. Good for breakfast or lunch, this recipe has some big flavors. The recipe calls for labne or skyr (Icelandic style very thick yogurt) for a lighter touch, but feel free to use cream cheese if you prefer.

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Paper thin slices are key to success with this salad, so use your sharpest knife for the lemons and a Ben-Riner or mandolin for the radishes. If you do not have Meyer lemons, Eurekas will work if they are ripe, so look for deep yellow and fragrant ones.

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Although this is a topping for fish, it is good as a side salad as well. Add it to arugula or romaine for a nice salad. This dish is best made using a fixed blade slicer such as a Ben-Riner.

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Tilapia is the fish called for, but any firm filet of white fish will do. The chile in the recipe can be omitted, but the idea is that it is so scant that it only provides a nuance of heat and flavor.

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A simple salad of fresh and bracing flavors. Just right to cut through heavier cold weather fare. The light orange dressing adds sweetness that complements the flavors. A mandolin is best for making this salad, especially the Japanese Ben-Riner type with the fine comb for the carrots.

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Watermelon radishes share many qualities with turnips. They cook up like turnips, but they are amazingly colored inside, like a late Autumn sunset. When cooked, the colors soften a little but are still vibrant. This cooking method softens the slight bitter quality and plays up the sweetness.

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The mild heat and earthy funk of radishes is contrasted with flavors usually associated with sweets. The radish reminds me of turnips, and I love to glaze turnips, so that is how this came about. Be sure not to overcook the radishes in the water or you wind up with too much “funk”, and mush to boot.

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