Currently viewing the tag: "vegetarian"

Although any pretty much any carrot will work, big Chantenay carrots are great here. Chantenay become sweeter and seem to be tenderer as they get larger, and for slow cooking, as in this recipe, they are perfect. The nuts added at the end add crunchy contrast to the tender vegetables, and the nutty flavor adds depth to the dish.

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This is a dish inspired by the flavors of southern France. The addition of the semi-dry (a.k.a. oil-cured or semi-dry oil cured) olives adds a depth and sweetness to the dish along with a winy/meaty flavor.

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INGREDIENTS:

4-6 medium potatoes such as Desiree, Romanze, Sangre, or other firm starchy potato, cut into ½ to ¾ inch cubes (size should be similar to the cauliflower pieces)
1 head cauliflower, florets only, trimmed to around 1 inch (halve in needed)
Olive oil as needed
Salt and pepper to taste

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There are many dishes where the greens of things such radishes, turnips, and carrots are combined with used as a sauce for the roots they are attached to. Here is a recipe that has a powerfully “green” flavor to it similar to that of nettles, and is colorful as well. Be sure to wash the leaves in several changes of water as they seem to hold sand and fine particles well.

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Unless you have home made tomato sauce, canned tomatoes work best here, especially if you have good Italian San Marzanos. Otherwise, just use your favorite. Be sure to use a really big pan for sautéing the squash, or do it in batches. If the squash is crowded it will steam and just get mushy.

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This is a mash of fava beans studded with small bits of summer squash flash sautéed to crisp them up a bit. This dish could serve as a topping for crostini or something from the grill. Here it is served in small Romaine leaves as a mezze. This dish has flavorings more from the Middle East, but switching the cilantro for mint or basil, and removing the cumin will swing it towards Italy, France, and Spain.

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This is a quick to make dish where the capers and wine play with the earthy sweetness of the chard. This recipe works fine with green and gold chard, but red chard might not work as it is earthier tasting than the others.

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Another version of a classic pairing, using blood oranges this time. If blood oranges are not in season, just use another orange or tangerine. The oranges are cut into “suprêmes”, or filets, rather than just rounds as they are more uniform and easier to eat. A mandolin is helpful for shaving the fennel.

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INGREDIENTS:

1 pound asparagus-as thick as you can find
½ pound shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and reserved for stock
½ cup white wine such as Grenache Blanc
½ teaspoon fresh minced ginger

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This quickle is meant to show off the colors of the carrots to their best effect, and allow the taste differences of each to still show through. Since some red carrots are only red as far as the skin, this method of cleaning preserves the color and renders the carrots clean and safe. This recipe uses cilantro and coriander seed because the idea of keeping it all in the family appeals to me, but you could use other herbs as long as it is subtle. Using low acid vinegar- around 4 to 5% or 40 to 50 grain- such as rice or white balsamic is easy and preserves the flavors of the carrots. You can dilute other vinegars with water to get to this number if you wish. Stronger vinegar will need more sugar to balance the flavors. You will want a mandolin to make this easy.

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This dressing goes with the Fennel and Blood Orange Salad. If blood oranges aren’t in season, use another orange. The use of fennel oil and orange blossom water add depth of flavor and emphasis to the salad ingredients. Using orange blossom water this way is inspired by Moroccan cuisine where it is sometimes drizzled on a dish at the last moment to add aroma. If you do not have this or the fennel oil, don’t worry, the dressing will still be quite good.

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“Confit” is the term for slow cooking something to tenderness in a (typically) oil bath, and for whatever it is that has been cooked this way. This may seem like a lot of oil, but the oil is part of the yield of this dish, and is great for building other dishes. Use it with braised meats and for flavoring fennel poached fish, or use it to flavor spreads like tapenade or on a sandwich. The fennel confit can be used to top cocques and pizzas, as a base for fish or chicken, or in salads and sandwiches, among many other things, and is great for giving you a quick jumping off point for quick meals.

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Paper thin slices are key to success with this salad, so use your sharpest knife for the lemons and a Ben-Riner or mandolin for the radishes. If you do not have Meyer lemons, Eurekas will work if they are ripe, so look for deep yellow and fragrant ones.

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This is a riff on something from a restaurant. Light in body, but with plenty of flavor.

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This recipe calls for cooking the kales separately first so the greens keep more individuality. If you like the idea of the greens integrating into the lentils and melting down more, skip the part about removing them from the pot. Most recipes do not call for soaking lentils, but you can. This helps them cook faster, which means they don’t explode before they are tender, as well as making minerals more bio-available to the body. If you do not wish to soak your lentils, just rinse them and start the dish. This dish makes enough for generous servings plus some leftovers for lunch.

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This is loosely based around a traditional Japanese treatment of greens. The stems of shiitakes are frequently too tough to eat, but still contain plenty of flavor. Using the stems for a “stock” base keeps them from going to waste and boosts the flavor of the dish. See Chef’s Notes for more about this.

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This dressing is for the Arugula, Celeriac, and Hazelnut Salad, but goes well with many things. Any thing with arugula, and beets match especially well with this dressing, as do crisped porcini mushrooms. For nut oils, I like the Tourangelle line of oils. I find them to be full flavored, fresh, and relatively inexpensive for the quality, which I find to be consistent.

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This combination of flavors just seems to work so well together. Use this for stuffing birds or pork chops, combine with wild rice or other grains, or just serve as a side dish.

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A colorful combination of textures and flavors, this is a quick and healthful salad. Made with daikon radish, it is quite traditional. The use of watermelon radishes would be novel, but quite colorful. A mixture of daikon and watermelon radishes would make this dish arresting to the eye. This is one of those dishes where a Ben-Riner or other fixed-blade slicer is really handy.

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Although called Spanish Radish, these are well-liked in places like Russia where the winters are harsh and the ground is cold. These radishes store really well if kept cold. The recipe takes its inspiration from Russian cuisine. This salad would be a nice accompaniment to gravlax, borscht, or braised beef.

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This is a good thing to have in the freezer as it can be used as a “spread” out of the refrigerator for things like sandwiches and crackers with smoked salmon, or use it to top grilled salmon or steamed chicken as an instant sauce. Slip thin slices under the skin of a chicken to be roasted and you get a moist buttery chicken with lots of fresh herb flavor. It is great for making a pan sauce as well; after sautéing some scallops or fish, de-glaze the pan with some white wine and/or lemon juice and add small cubes of this compound butter to form the sauce.

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Carrots and dill just seem made for each other. Perhaps it is because they are related to one another that the flavors marry so well.

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This is a dish with lots of big, aggressive flavors contrasting with the sweetness of the cauliflower. Goes well with roast chicken, burgers, grilled chops, or sausages.

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The dressing for this salad has only a little cream in it, hence it is mentioned last. It is just creamy enough enhance the earthiness of beets and offset any sharpness of the mustard. The colors of this salad are nice and bright, and the flavors are vivacious. If you do not have a fixed-blade slicer for the carrots, see the method for using a peeler in the notes. A grater just doesn’t give sharp edges to the carrots to achieve the desired effect of crispness.

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This is a variation on the classic Red Flannel Hash of New England. There are many versions of this dish, some starting with raw vegetables, some use already cooked vegetables (left over from the corned beef dinner of the night before), some with eggs, all usually with corned beef. This version uses some cooked veg, some raw, and does not call for any meat, although there is an option for that. Also, this version calls for a smaller dice than most recipes, but this yields more crunchy surface while allowing the vegetables to cook all the way through without burning the surface. If you wish to use eggs, you can either cook them separately or add them to the mix and bake the lot until the eggs are done.

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Roasting the squash adds depth of flavor, and the apple and squash are a great combination. There are different options for seasoning the soup that, while they are small changes, they move the soup a lot in terms of flavor.

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This dressing is nice with assertive flavors or things with a bitter edge to them, such as radishes, turnips, or chicories. It is also nice used on fish or shrimp. If you don’t have tangerines, just use oranges.

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This is an all-in-one dish with eggs, vegetables, and grains. It works without the grains, too, but if you make them the night before or have leftovers, it is even easier. Carrots add a sweetness that counters the sometimes almost tannic mineral quality of chard. The eggs are baked “whole”, not mixed in as a batter like a quiche, so the yolks act as a sauce and make for a pretty dish.

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These gnocchi are great with the “standard” brown butter with sage, but adding hazelnuts for depth and a little crunch make these memorable. A light tomato sauce with garlic would also be a good pairing.

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Use these as croutons on salads or soups, or simply serve them as a side dish.

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