Currently viewing the tag: "vinaigrette"

Here is another vinaigrette where tomato is the flavor. Use flavorful tomatoes, or your dressing will just be a reddish vegetal tasting vinaigrette.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The creamy part of this dressing derives from yogurt. Use this dressing with beet and kale salads, cucumbers, with chicken, or shredded carrot and lettuce salads.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a dressing based on a sauce posted before. The trick is to char, not to burn the scallions. This flavor strikes some as odd at first, but there is something about it, maybe the primal fire-pit thing makes b.b.q. irresistible, which makes this dressing very appealing. It goes well with bold and earthy flavors, such as the radish escarole salad, or with a grass-fed beef steak salad. Keep it handy for dipping vegetables into or anointing sandwiches with, or drizzling on firm fleshed fish, shrimp, and eggs.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is for a salad of soft lettuces and strawberries, but would go with cold pasta salad with tomato and cucumber, with cold chicken for a hot summer day, poached salmon hot or cold, or something with cabbage or kales, as well as salads made up of Romaine or Little Gems.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is the dressing that goes with the above named recipe, but this, or any number of variants, could go with any salad of dense leaves such as the cabbages, kales, or things like mei quin choi or shredded carrot or celeriac. Lighter in oil, this recipe will not emulsify like a regular vinaigrette. Adding mustard will help the salad thicken, but be careful what mustard you use and how much lest you blow out the dressing and just have a thin and pungent mustard garnish for the salad.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is to with the Arugula, Dried Apricots, and Pistachio salad, but it can be used with other components as well. Try with Butterleaf or oak leaf lettuces with plenty of sprouts.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use port you are drinking, or buy a mid-range port if you wish. Don’t buy a great vintage just for this dressing, but don’t buy something really cheap, and NEVER buy “cooking” port or wine. Typically, any wine product labelled “cooking” will have salt in it. This was to discourage chefs of old from drinking the wine, but it was also made with inferior wine You could use hazel nuts and hazel nut oil if you wish as well.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

When you want the refinement and acid of sherry vinegar, but want a little sweetness too, this is the dressing.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing was concocted for the Arugula, Radish, and Strawberry salad originally, so calls for good quality ingredients as well as a neutral flavored oil such as grapeseed.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

INGREDIENTS:

1 small clove garlic, peeled

½ teaspoon minced/pulverized shallot

Salt and pepper to taste

1 pinch of fresh thyme leaves, minced, or a smallish pinch of dried thyme leaves

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This was first done for a salad of beets, a peppery cress, arugula, and shreds of Little Gem lettuce. It will go with plenty of other salads of sharp or spicy elements, as well as on pork chops or chicken. Use a milder olive oil, and be sure to use organic oranges with plenty of flavor and some acid. Organic because you want to rub the bowl with the orange skin to flavor the dressing.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

You can make this dressing with whatever peppers you wish, but avoid mixing colors or risk winding up with an unappetizing shade of blech. Also, if you use spicy peppers and this is a dressing for a salad, consider using some mild peppers in there to mitigate the heat. If you are making this as a condiment to drizzle onto a plate, go for it.

Continue reading »

A slightly chunky vinaigrette with a bright, funky aroma, this dressing works on salads and is excellent as a topping for grilled fish such as snapper, tilapia, or halibut. Use with pork medallions, chicken with cumin and oregano, or even on noodles like ramen tossed with vegetables and leftover shredded meat.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

I like to make berry infused vinegars which I use as parts of marinades or sauces, and of course I also use them for salad dressings. When using them for dressing, I tend to either use them to contrast with sharper, bitter leaves such as escarole, dandelion, rocket, and the like, or I pair them with more delicate lettuces and then add some fruit and or nuts to the mix. I could see a salad of butterleaf lettuces with strawberries, slivered roasted almonds, and maybe a little bit of crumbled blue cheese with a strawberry vinaigrette made with the vinegar, a little agave syrup, some shallot, a little ginger juice, black pepper, and a light oil such as grapeseed with a touch of almond oil. Garnish the salad with candied ginger bits and a little black pepper that has been dry roasted in a pan-this neutralizes much of the heat and leaves the pepper fruity-and freshly cracked.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing goes with a salad of strawberries, lettuce, and pepitas, as well as with a dice of corn, red onion, bell peppers, and cilantro. Sauté it or use raw and dress with this vinaigrette. Use this vinaigrette to dress fish tacos or pulled pork sandwiches. Although the roasted garlic is an extra step, the flavor really is subtler than raw garlic, and the roasted garlic adds a creamy texture to the dressing.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a straightforward dressing, so use high quality white wine vinegar, as there is no where for any flaws to hide. The same with the white balsamic vinegar.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This is a bare bones simple white balsamic dressing for when you want the flavors of the salad to stand out.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing would go well with a salad of arugula and frisee with pomegranate seeds and hazelnuts, or another salad with similar flavors. This dressing would also be a good sauce on chicken or grilled lamb chops, or drizzled over grilled salmon or used to dress lentils while hot.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

“Lighter Flavored” refers to the lighter cilantro flavor, so it is a background note rather than a star. The use of cilantro seed powder enhances the dressing by adding a subtle citrusy aroma and flavor that works well with the other elements. Try this dressing with roast squash, as in the Orange Hokkaido and Kale Salad, or with fish and shrimp, or pork.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Straightforward lemony dressing, with Meyers supplying wonderful floral notes and lower acid. This recipe has boundless uses.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing was concocted for Grilled Strawberries and Little Gem Salad, but would work well with grilled shrimp, lamb meatballs, or falafel. It would go nicely with Herbed Chicken Paillards in a sandwich as well.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Use this dressing for the Spinach, Tomato, and Strawberry Salad if you have the oil and nuts. This dressing will go well with many things. Anything with spinach, and especially arugula, match well with this dressing, as do crisped porcini mushrooms. Use this dressing for a salad if arugula and cress to top thin pan seared pork chops nut crusted swordfish. For nut oils, I like the Tourangelle line of oils. I find them to be full flavored, fresh, and relatively inexpensive for the quality, which I find to be consistent. If you wish, you can substitute almond oil for different salads.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Although offered here for Salad of Spinach and Quickled Fennel and Purplette Onions, the dressing would suit pork chops, shrimp (hot or cold), or grilled fish just fine.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing is for a salad of chunks of radish with tender lettuce. Pretty simple, but excellent in its simplicity. Try this dressing with assertive or bitter salad leaves such as escarole, endive, chicory, and radicchios.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This salad is about contrasts; of flavors, of textures, colors, and if you are quick enough, you can even work contrasting temperatures into the salad. Escarole and radicchio are both bitter, but the roasted beets with their marination of balsamic vinegar provide a sweet contrast. If you wait to grill the radicchio until just before dressing the salad you can even get a contrast between the hot red radicchio and the rest of the salad which is served cool, or even cold. Radicchio can be quite bitter, but grilling it mitigates much of the bitterness. To step this salad up, check the options in the ingredients. The use of avocado or a creamy blue cheese, or adding romaine lettuce will mitigate the bitter elements further and will contrast nicely with the crunchy elements.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This dressing was made to go with the Salad of Grilled Radicchio, Escarole, and Roasted Beets, where the creamy sweetness will tame the assertive bitterness of the chicories. Try this with peppery greens like rocket and cress, or use for a cold pasta salad with broccoli or rapini.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

The dressing would be good with assertive greens such as radicchio, escarole, frisée, or dandelions. Try it tossed with pasta with greens such as kales or rapini.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This basic dressing uses lemon juice bolstered with vinegar for acid. The vinegar adds balance to the lemon juice, which can sometimes be harsh, especially when combined with a sharp Tuscan style extra-virgin olive oil. If your lemons are really tart, you could use all lemon juice. You can also use water to lower the acidity if you do not want to use a vinegar.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

This does not use as much oil as a standard vinaigrette, so is much lighter. Excellent on cucumbers or a “slaw” of savoy or nappa cabbage with grated carrots. For sesame oil, I favor Kadoya brand for its pure clean flavor and aroma. If you can find it, try the Black Sesame seed oil for a deeper flavor. Using a blender for this dressing makes it a snap, although shaking it up in a quart jar with a tight fitting lid is good too.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

Let’s get this straight right off the bat. This is not a “light” dressing as in low-cal or dietetic. It is light in that it uses both regular and white balsamic vinegars for a lighter flavor and color. This is for when you want that wonderful complexity of flavor you get from balsamic vinegar, but you don’t want something as forthright as a straight-up balsamic vinaigrette, or there are elements of the salad that already have some balsamic vinegar.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
 

SIGN UP FOR CSA PROGRAM

When you join our CSA, you sign up with the farm to receive a share of the harvest during our 36 week season from mid-March to mid-November. In return, you get a weekly box of organic vegetables and fruit (and optional flowers) delivered straight from our farm to a pick-up site in your neighborhood.

Signup for the CSA program >

View our CSA Members Page

This is where you can go to find out what's coming in your box each week, find recipes, identify your vegetables with pictures, and view or print the current and past newsletters. Check here for the information you need to use your box to the fullest.

Visit the CSA Members Page >